Watch Radiohead’s Thom Yorke and Jonny Greenwood play rarities during duo set

Pair played a charity gig in Le Marche, a region recently hit by earthquakes

Radiohead‘s Thom Yorke and Jonny Greenwood played a handful of rarities during their special duo set in Italy at the weekend.

The pair played a charity gig in Le Marche, a region recently hit by earthquakes.

During the set, Yorke and Greenwood performed a number of songs that they hadn’t aired live in year, including ‘Faust Arp’ from ‘In Rainbows’, ‘A Wolf At The Door’ from ‘Hail To The Thief’, ‘Cymbal Rush’ from Yorke’s 2006 solo album ‘The Eraser’ and the unreleased ‘Follow Me Around’.

Watch the band perform ‘Faust Arp’ (at the 15.20 mark) and ‘Follow Me Around’ (44.40) in the video below.

Yorke and Greenwood played the following songs:

Daydreaming
Bloom
Faust Arp (First time live since 2010)
The Numbers
Weird Fishes/Arpeggi
Nude
Exit Music (For A Film)
I Might Be Wrong
Follow Me Around (First time live since 2010)
A Wolf At The Door (First time live since 2012)
How To Disappear Completely
Present Tense
Give Up The Ghost
Cymbal Rush (Thom Yorke solo track) (First performance with Radiohead since 2008)
Like Spinning Plates
All I Need
Street Spirit (Fade Out)
Pyramid Song
Everything In Its Right Place
No Surprises
Karma Police

Meanwhile, Ed Balls has accepted Radiohead‘s invitation to see them live again, saying that he is willing to give the band another chance after having originally described them as “dirge-like”.

Former Labour politician – and Strictly Come Dancing contestant – Balls recently penned an article for The Guardian in which he described going to Glastonbury Festival for the first time, describing Radiohead’s headline set as “dirge-like” and “fuzzy, blurry, psychedelic pap”.

Speaking to NME last week (August 18), Radiohead drummer Philip Selway said that he hadn’t read Balls’ original comments, but added: “He’ll have to come again when we play again. Hopefully we can change his mind.”

Balls has now taken to Twitter to accept the invitation, saying: “I’d love to give it a go. Surely millions of fans can’t be wrong… can they?”