The Fall - Hex Enduction Hour

NME.COM feature on The Fall - Hex Enduction Hour album including album review, artwork, tracks, listen now, tour dates, discography and more.

Release date: 07 September 2009

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The Fall - Hex Enduction Hour Videos

More The Fall - Hex Enduction Hour Videos

The Fall News

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The Wurzels also join next year's three day summer bash

The Fall's back catalogue set for reissue

The Fall's back catalogue set for reissue

'This Nation's Saving Grace' is the first to be re-released

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The Fall - Hex Enduction Hour: Wikipedia Album Entry

Hex Enduction Hour is a 1982 album by The Fall. It showcased a new two-drummer lineup, and the most accessible music they had yet produced. The music remained raw and noisy, but with a more pronounced melodic sense. The album was partly recorded in Iceland during the group's 1981 visit, with the remainder being completed in a disused cinema in Hitchin, England.

Mark E. Smith told journalist Sandy Robertson that he had envisaged Hex as being the group's final album and that he would not have continued in music had this been the case. However, the record received very positive reviews and was the first Fall album to make the official chart, spending 3 weeks in and peaking at #71.

In 1984, Motown Records expressed an interest in signing the band to a new UK division and asked to hear their back catalogue. "Hex" was the only album Smith had to hand. The letter the group received back stated "I see no commercial potential in this band whatsoever". Smith publicly speculated that this might have had something to do with the lines "Where are the obligatory niggers? / Hey there, fuckface" from album opener "The Classical".

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