The Stone Roses - The Stone Roses

NME.COM feature on The Stone Roses - The Stone Roses album including album review, artwork, tracks, listen now, tour dates, discography and more.

Album Review

Release date: 30 November 1988

The Stone Roses - The Stone Roses

Stone Roses : The Very Best Of The Stone Roses

Mancunian magic...

Back in 1987, Melvyn Bragg had a problem. Rock profiles on The South Bank Show were a rarity, but Melvyn had found a band he felt warranted some Sunday night analysis: The Smiths , a group that had defined themselves by doing what nobody expected. True to form, between the filming and the editing of the programme, the band did what nobody expected and split up. Hastily revising his...

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  • Nov 12, 2002

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The Stone Roses - 'Made Of Stone'

The Stone Roses - 'Made Of Stone'

What Shane Meadows’ reunion doc lacks in journalistic rigour, it makes up for with tear-jerking affection

  • Jun 3, 2013

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The Stone Roses - The Stone Roses Videos

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The Stone Roses News

The Stone Roses refuse to comment on split rumour

The Stone Roses refuse to comment on split rumour

Rumours emerged online that the band and label are dissolving their contract

Ian Brown says 'you never know' what's next for The Stone Roses as he marks Aziz Ibrahim's 50th

Ian Brown says 'you never know' what's next for The Stone Roses as he marks Aziz Ibrahim's 50th

Members of The Smiths, Oasis, Primal Scream, XTC and more appeared at The Roadhouse for a charity party

Shane Meadows on why he missed chance to hear new Stone Roses songs – watch

Shane Meadows on why he missed chance to hear new Stone Roses songs – watch

'Made Of Stone' director says he scuppered his chances by showing band a 'rubbish' cut of the film

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The Stone Roses - The Stone Roses: Wikipedia Album Entry

The Stone Roses LP was recorded between June 1988 and Febuary 1989 by the Stone Roses with producer John Leckie. It was then released on the 13th of March 1989 on the Silvertone music label. The artwork for the album was inspired by American artist Jackson Pollock. The album was then released in the United States on the 2nd of May 1989, following a release in Australia in December that year. The album has since seen various re-releases, in September 1991, then in 1999 for the 10 year anniversary edition and just recently it was announced their would be a 20th anniversary edition also. It cemented the band's reputation among critics, even today, as one of the most important albums ever. In 2006, the writers of NME declared the album the greatest British album of all time.

As with most Stone Roses releases, the cover displays a work by John Squire. It is a Jackson Pollock-influenced piece titled "Bye Bye Badman," which makes reference to the May 1968 riots in Paris.

The cover was named by Q magazine as one of "The 100 Best Covers of All Time." In the accompanying article, Squire said: "Ian [Brown] had met this French man when he was hitching around Europe, this bloke had been in the riots, and he told Ian how lemons had been used as an antidote to tear gas. Then there was the documentary—-a great shot at the start of a guy throwing stones at the police. I really liked his attitude." This story was also the inspiration for the lyrics to the song of the same name. The background of the piece is based on the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland. The band visited the causeway while playing a gig at the University of Ulster in Coleraine.

In 1989, the critical response was generally positive, and today the album is widely considered to be one of the very best British albums ever released. In 1997, it was named the 2nd greatest album of all time in a "Music of the Millennium" poll[citation needed] conducted by HMV, Channel 4, The Guardian and Classic FM. In 1998, Q magazine readers placed it at number 4, while in 2000 the same magazine placed it at number 29 in its list of the "100 Greatest British Albums Ever." In 2008, it was named the 5th "greatest British album ever" by a Q magazine/HMV poll.

The music weekly NME initially gave the album 7 out of 10, but lavished praise on it in later years. In 2000, it received the "greatest album ever" award at the NME Premier Awards show, and in 2006, the album topped the magazine's "100 Greatest British Albums Ever" list. In summer 2009, NME released a special issue about the album's 20th anniversary, labelling it as "the greatest debut album ever."

In 2005, Spin magazine ranked it 78 on its list of the "100 greatest albums of the past twenty years." In the same year, when revising the "500 Greatest Albums" for book format, Rolling Stone included it as one of the eight new entries placing it at #497. In 2006, Time named it one of "The All-TIME 100 Albums." In 2003, Pitchfork Media named it the 39th best album of the 1980s.

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