Not only is Alex Turner able to rock with the best of them on Arctic Monkeys‘ most visceral cuts (‘Pretty Visitors’), he’s also established himself as quite the acoustic crooner too.

Yesterday, Alex Turner and fellow Last Shadow Puppets man Miles Kane treated us to an acoustic version of their hypnotic new single ‘Miracle Aligner’, which you can see below.

Soothing, right? Fancy a few more acoustic ballads from Mr Turner? Of course you do, here are Alex Turner’s finest unplugged performances to date.

10. ‘Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High’

The Monkeys’ funkiest and grooviest moment so far is boiled down to a gentle acoustic strum in this take from a 2014 radio session in the US.

9. ‘Piledriver Waltz’

The track first appeared on the ‘Submarine’, Turner’s debut foray into solo music-making in 2011, as a dainty acoustic swan-song. For the Monkeys’ fourth album ‘Suck It And See’, the tune was bolstered with addition of the remainder of the band – but here he’s gone back-to-basics with a beautiful acoustic rendition.

8. ‘Feels Like We Only Go Backwards’ (Tame Impala Cover)

So this one isn’t a Turner original, but he tackles Kevin Parker’s dreamy falsetto vocals with an exotic Sheffield-via-Los-Angeles twang.

7. ‘Mardy Bum’

The vocals are obviously patchy and it’s certainly not the most-polished sounding acoustic number on this list – but there’s no doubting that debut album hit ‘Mardy Bum’ fast-tracked their route into superstardom.

Years later, Turner would incorporate the acoustic opening into the string-heavy live version, as demonstrated during their iconic Glastonbury headline set in 2013.

6. ‘Reckless Serenade’

Alex Turner might have adopted the 1950s Teddy Boy/T-Birds look just weeks prior, but here we’ve still got the delicate and sweet vocals that made ‘Reckless Serenade’ such a highlight on ‘Suck It And See’.

5. ‘My Mistakes Were Made For You’

Ah, Turner and Kane looked like wee school-boys when they slinked through this dazzling rendition of ‘My Mistakes Were Made For You’ back in 2008, the year of The Last Shadow Puppets’ debut, ‘The Age of the Understatement’. The vocals are a tad chipmunky, but Turner demonstrates his ability to turn into a bonafide crooner, years in advance.

4. ‘Fluorescent Adolescent’

Another throwback to the ‘Favourite Worst Nightmare’-era sees Turner tackle one of his grittiest songs in delightful fashion as he carefully avoids the tongue-twister minefield he laid for himself.

3. ‘Cornerstone’

Third album ‘Humbug’ saw AM head to the desert with Josh Homme and embrace the rock giants they showed hints of becoming – but there was the occasional tender moment hidden within and none more so beautiful than on single ‘Cornerstone’. Sporting shoulder-length hair and a set of angelic pipes, Turner submits another hypnotising performance on one of the Monkeys’ finest tracks to date.

2. ‘A Certain Romance’

The hyper-aware ‘A Certain Romance’ is arguably one of Turner’s lyrical highlights and despite it appearing originally as a raucous album closer on debut ‘Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not’, here it is stripped back and transformed into a gentle acoustic hoedown.

1. ‘Snap Out Of It’

Easily Turner’s most exquisite moment with an acoustic guitar is this stunning re-imagining of ‘AM’s ‘Snap Out Of It’. The jaunty piano riff is discarded and instead a thumping blues-rock riff is introduced with Turner’s vocals showcasing outstanding range. Plus, there’s the bonus of Helders’ falsetto – which is always a good thing.