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Glastonbury's Most Talked-About Sets - Three Word Reviews From The Crowd

By NME Blog

Posted on 29 Jun 14

 
Glastonbury's Most Talked-About Sets - Three Word Reviews From The Crowd
 

Hundreds of bands take to Glastonbury's stages over the course of the weekend, but of course some spark more attention than others. Whether they're acts waiting to prove they can step up to the next level, acts showing they've still got it or, in the case of Lana Del Rey, proving they can even sing live at all, there were a few sets that sparked talking points across the entire site.

We spoke to members of the crowd after sets by Friday's Pyramid headliners Arcade Fire and Other Stage headliner Skrillex, polarising "indie" band Imagine Dragons and Pyramid Stage stars Lana Del Rey and Jack White to get their first reactions. Here's the verdict, in three word, fan reviews.

Arcade Fire
Fireworks, glitter and giant bobbleheads dancing to a human disco ball DJing 'Common People' - Arcade Fire's set truly had it all. Here's what the crowd thought:


Skrillex
Topping the bill on the Other Stage, Skrillex and his giant tank booth were the choice for those wanting to get a little wavy. From those who could just about still string a sentence together by the end, here's what the verdict was:


Lana Del Rey
After a string of early, ropey live shows, Lana had a huge test ahead of her when she took to the mighty Pyramid stage on Saturday afternoon. Did she pull it off? Have a look...


Jack White
With a back catalogue that could fill approximately a full 24 hours worth of stage time, Jack White had the pick of the hits (White Stripes? Dead Weather? Solo?) to choose from for his set. Did he pick the right ones? Let's see:


Imagine Dragons
And finally, to Imagine Dragons - commercially massive but a critical disaster zone. Did their brand of mum-approved indie manage to charm the folk of Glastonbury?

 
 
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