NME.COM

Setting off to Pilton this week? Take Justin Young of the Vaccines' advice and make the most of your Glastonbury weekend - after all, they come but once a year. Having criticised Michael and Emily Eavis' booking of The Who as Sunday headliners as safe, we cornered the frontman to hear how to play it unsafe at Worthy Farm...

Go feral

The first time Justin Young attended Glastonbury was far from a resounding success. “I didn’t really have a proper ticket and I lost my phone and spent the whole weekend walking around, muddy, alone and miserable,” he shudders. “But fast forward five years and The Vaccines are playing the Pyramid Stage, two from the top of the whole festival, which was a pretty unbelievable experience. I didn’t actually love that gig, but the fact we were on that stage… I’ll never forget that.”



Get varied

If the Eavis’ choice to book heritage-rockers The Who to headline Worthy Farm at the expense of a more current act like Florence And The Machine was too unadventurous for Justin, what edgier alternatives does he recommend? “The good thing about Glastonbury is that every band in the history of the world ever is playing. Father John Misty is very characterful. There’s a real humanity to what he’s doing. Everything about Sleaford Mods is punk rock for the 21st century! There’s no safety limits to it and it’s like punk rock poetry. Spiritualized was one of the first gigs I ever went to. For me, they’re a big band that I have an emotional connection to.”



Park up

“The Park Stage is my favourite place to go and see interesting bands," says Justin. "I’ll quite often go and er, park up – that pun’s awful isn’t it? – and stay there for hours on end and watch four or five bands one after the other.”



Watch the wilder headliners

While he’s eschewing The Who, Young is keen to witness Yeezus. “The headliners are always such a spectacle. It’s this incredible seductive energy. Even if you’re not a fan of who’s playing, you can’t help but being swept away. But I’m a massive fan of Kanye and I think he’s going to pull out all of the stops and silence the critics. When he’s put in a corner or has something prove, he excels.”



Embrace your inner moron

“You have to check out of the Stone Circle when the sun’s coming up. I call it ‘Moron’s Mound’, because everyone’s just gurning their faces off. There’s no such thing as night and day at Glastonbury. It just keeps going. You need to realise you’re there five days, embrace it and accept your fate. It’s a marathon – don’t end up at Moron’s Mound too early.”

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