First for music news
This Week's Issue
You’re logged in

NME Blogs - NME Blogs

10 Tracks You Have To Hear This Week - Klaxons, Kisses, Marina and the Diamonds

By NME Blog

Posted on 01 Jul 10

 
 

1. Klaxons – ‘Echoes’

Of course, if you’ve been to see this band at any point in the last 12 months you’ll be aware of the nuts, bolts and bits of fluoro bolted on top of the bolts of this song. Yet it’s still thrilling to hear a new Klaxons recording blaring out of stereo speakers, all shiny, synthetic and future-indebted, only still infused with the raw fleshy heart that, from ‘Golden Skans’ to ‘Two Receivers’, has long defined their best songs.
Klaxons
And, as the opening song and lead-off single from the band’s forthcoming second record ‘Surfing The Void’, it’s also an intriguing teaser for what the year’s most anticipated pop comeback sounds like. Which given we’ve heard it, is Blur gone disco, basically. Or The Cure at their most art rock. And do you want to know what’s most thrilling? ‘Echoes’ isn’t even the fifth best song on the record.
[James McMahon, Features Editor]
[Listen]



2. H.U.N.X. – ‘The Loco-Motion’
Not content with creating his own blend of smutty rock’n’roll, Seth Bogart, aka Hunx of And His Punx fame, has gone one step gayer with his new disco project. Brace yourself for tales of vampiric blowjobs over ’90s house – yes, really. Perhaps most infectious, however, is his take on ‘The Loco-Motion’. It’s waaay more Kylie than Little Eva, by the way…
[Camilla Pia, writer]
HUNX



3. Rose Elinor Dougall – ‘I Know We’ll Never’
This poetic session track from the ex-Pipette is a good sign of things to come from her debut solo album. Attitude-filled indie pop – like Kate Nash before she got annoying in an all-over-the-charts-like-a-rash way.
[Abby Tayleure, writer]

[Free Download]

4. Toddla T – ‘Sky Surfing’
What happens when Toddla T ditches Sheffield for a prolonged stint in Jamaica? This – a rave/dancehall/bass behemoth bolted to “me and Toddla T are getting high” raps from Wayne Marshall. You get the feeling it would be rude not to join them.
[Tim Chester, Assistant Editor, NME.COM]
Toddla T


5. Kisses – ‘Bermuda’
This summer you’re probably seeing a resurgence in chino short-shorts, starched white tube socks and pastel-toned polos. That’s thanks in part to the deck-lounging yacht-pop of LA synth-horder Jesse Kivel and his missus. Button-cute couple act alert!
[Jaimie Hodgson, New Music Editor]
Kisses


6. 2.54 – ‘Creeping’
London’s dark underbelly has been kind to us recently, spewing out gothy, scree-laden goodness with abandon. Its latest smoky gem comes from 2:54, aka sisters Hannah and Collette Thurow, whose stinging, spite-laden guitar and mesmerisingly
chilly tones recall Slint if they’d been signed to Creation and fronted by stony-hearted she-demons of the underworld.
[Laura Snapes, writer]
[Listen Here]

7. Orphan Boy – ‘Popsong’
Cleethorpes-via-Manchester’s Orphan Boy were initially pegged as lad-rock in the Twisted Wheel/Enemy vein, but their latest A&R-dissing single is as tender, lyrically sharp – “Fiddled with his scarf/Licked his lips while he told lies” – and sophisticated as it is powerful and in-yer-face.
[Hamish MacBain, Assistant Editor]


8. Mr Little Jeans – ‘Angel’
The newest addition to Neon Gold, Mr Little Jeans is in fact a Miss. Born Monica Birkenes, this Norwegian lass serves up an intoxicating mix of ‘It’s Blitz!’ Karen O and Debbie Harry. It’s obviously brilliant, and will fit your ears tighter than boil-washed skinny-jeans.
[Ailbhe Malone, writer]


9. Frank Sidebottom – ‘Three Shirts On My Line’
Shocked by the sudden death of his inner-ego Chris Sievey, fans are hoping the great, giant-headed Frank Sidebottom can live on through this World Cup pastiche he recorded just weeks ago. The Facebook campaign to get him to Number One by the end of the tournament is ready, all we need now is a major download site to host the song. iTunes? Amazon? We’re looking at you…
[Paul Stokes, News Editor]


10. Marina And The Diamonds – ‘Oh No (Active Child Remix)’
LA’s Pat Grossi is set on thrusting Marina’s brazen head in a font of chilly, pure and cleansing synths. She emerges somewhere between ‘Celestica’ and Enigma’, a changed woman – even if you can’t stand her, you’ll love this.
[Emily Mackay, Reviews Editor]

[Free Download]

 
 
 
Comments

Please login to add your comment.

 
Latest Tickets - Booking Now
 
Know Your NME
 

 
Most Read News
Popular This Week
NME Store & Framed Prints
Inside NME.COM
On NME.COM Today