I love ‘Gimme Shelter’ because it’s full of dread.

It’s spooky, it’s really sexual and it implies violence and darkness. The atmosphere is dark but there’s tiny embers of light there. It just always makes me feel… not chilling, but it’s like their antenna as artists were really up and really open and they captured that year, 1969. The turbulence, the dread, the paranoia. Everything was of that time and they’re real artists because they captured that apocalyptic feeling.

They played it at Altamont and I have a bootleg of that. I remember being in a psychedelic club in the late 80s in London, in a railway siding up in Chalk Farm, and there were these two goth girls dancing to ‘Gimme Shelter’. It was really pagan. I was just watching them and they were completely lost in the music. The were good looking chicks as well, but they were gone and it was just a magical moment. I remember thinking it was really tribalistic and pagan. Glastonbury is the perfect place for it, with the paganism and tribalism. It’s got a really primitive feeling to it… I don’t know, I’m not a music journalist!

Bobby's favourite albums of 2013 (so far):

For Bobby Gillespie's state of the nation address, including his take on class war, protest music and playing Glastonbury with Haim, pick up this week's NME.

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