Reviews Editor Emily Mackay rounds up the key albums released in the UK on Monday 10 May. You can read our reviews, and listen to most of the albums in full, below

The Dead Weather – ‘Sea Of Cowards’
Personally I’d rather sandpaper my teeth while being force-fed old Boss Hog records being played at half speed and with all the fun sucked out than listen to the Dead Weather, but then, according to Dan Martin, it’s haterz like me that have made their new album ‘Sea Of Cowards’ just such a spitefully energetic rock bitchslap, so all to the good, eh?
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Foals – ‘Total Life Forever’
Foals, meanwhile, are growing up gracefully and Rob Parker finds many mysterious charms in their accomplished if sometimes baffling ‘Total Life Forever’.
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The National – ‘High Violet’
Wider acclaim has been a long time coming for The National, but Adam Kennedy is sure that it must, with their fresh, immediate and immaculately constructed ‘High Violet’ be in their grasp now. Let’s hope he’s right… Or singer Matt Berninger might eat your brains.
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The Hold Steady – ‘Heaven Is Whenever’
It’s all barfly-poet brotherhood and stirring social sentiment round these parts once more with the return of the sharpest-lyric office supplies salesman in the East, Craig Finn. It’s more of the same, acknowledges Barry Nicolson, but what a same it is.
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Broken Social Scene – ‘Forgiveness Rock Record’
Broken Social Scene have made a surprise return of the office stereo with their new album ‘Forgiveness Rock Record’, which, as Tim Chester points out is a rather rollicking reminder of everything you loved about them in the first place.
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Taylor Hawkins & The Coattail Riders – ‘Red Light Fever’
Solid and unremarkable riffery is the order of the day from the Foo Fighters’ drummer, whose guest-studded second solo effort, it strikes Edwin McFee cattily, “will probably appeal to viewers of Top Gear”.
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Holy Fuck – ‘Latin’
Holy Fuck’s Chatroulette antics don’t faze Jamie Fullerton any more than the electro-noise expletive-peddlers’ lack of emotional connect; all he’s here for are the banging tunes, and lo, HF have duly provided.
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Keane, ‘Night Train EP’
At eight tracks, it’s almost an album ,right? Well, not quite, as Gavin Haynes points out, more a collection of point-proving, check-us-out-we’re-so-experimental exercises in pushing the boundaries of “safe, dowdy AOR”.
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Ganglians – ‘Monster Head Room’
Along with Avi Buffalo and Harlem as part of a bunch of new US indie rockers who’ve been floating our boats recently, Ganglians have been making our spring that bit more sweetly grungey and plaid-clad. There’s some serious melodies on this beast.
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Male Bonding – ‘Nothing Hurts’
…But then again, Male Bonding have been proving they can beat the Yanks at their own game with their Sub Pop debut ‘Nothing Hurts’ whose bubble-gum surf grunge charmed the pants from Louis Pattison.
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For reviews of next week’s album releases, pick up the new issue of NME