"Epic" is an over-used word. The guitarist from Editors stamping on the FX pedal marked "wind tunnel" is not epic. Florence slathering her debut album with so much harp it sounds like one long flashback sequence – that's not epic. Neither is The Horrors nicking the plinky keyboard sound from Joy Division's 'These Days' - even if the song in question ('Sea Within A Sea') does go on for eight minutes.

The new Fuck Buttons album, though, that's properly epic. It's not just that the songs on 'Tarot Sport' are long – although they are; five of them nudge ten minutes – more that they expand hypnotically, in that chest-tightening way that makes you stop what you're doing and gaze, clench-jawed, at some imaginary white horizon (even if you're actually staring glumly at Microsoft Outlook at the time).

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The album - produced by Andrew Weatherall, who knows a thing or two about ecstatic, ever-building noise - crescendos with two jaw-dropping tracks, 'Space Mountain' (presumably inspired by a cracking family day out at Eurodisney) and 'Flight Of The Feathered Serpent'. They're the kind of surging, wordlessly emotive songs you'd want played at your funeral - if only to picture the looks on everyone's faces when the vicar said, "And now: Fuck Buttons".



It's essentially keyboard-driven drone-rock in the tradition of Spacemen 3 and Neu!; but it's more loose-limbed, less dour than that suggests. 'Flight…' even has a samba-tinged percussion breakdown, making it vaguely suggestive of what Kraftwerk might listen to on a South American beach holiday (do Kraftwerk go on holiday? It's hard to picture them in boardshorts and jelly shoes).

Like all the best drone music, the songs on 'Tarot Sport' become more mesmeric and enveloping the longer they go on, thereby honouring Neu! founder Michael Rother's theory of what defines krautrock - namely, "a feeling like you're taking off... this feeling of rushing forward, or flying to the horizon."

All of which gives us an opportunity to celebrate 'epic' music in a more general sense. Trouble is, it's a slippery term. Television's 'Marquee Moon' is ten minutes long, but you wouldn't necessarily call it epic.

I'm thinking more of songs that convey a sense of colossal scale, songs with a bit of blood-and-thunder to them, such as Led Zeppelin's 'Achilles Last Stand', from that blustery late period when they gave up trying to be all pastoral and folky and concentrated on sounding like a herd of mastodon crushing a burning chariot.

Or Spritualized's 'Cop Shoot Cop', which kicks off with the assertion that "Jesus died for nothing" and gets progressively more depressing over the ensuing 17 minutes. Or Suicide's 'Dream Baby Dream' (although I'd argue 'Springsteen's version is better).

Then of course there are the epic songs that are also yer actual hits: 'Bohemian Rhapsody', 'Paranoid Android', 'Knights Of Cydonia'.

Which other majestically epic tracks would you recommend? And no, 'Epic' by Faith No More doesn't count.

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