The Great Escape took place in various venues in Brighton over the weekend, and what a glorious weekend of sunshine, booze and bands it was. Here are the photo highlights. Pick up NME magazine on Wednesday 16 May to read our the full verdict on the best new bands at The Great Escape

Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

That’ll be Brighton, then. Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Hotly tipped US quartet Haim played The Audio venue. We described them as “Like The Virgin Suicides if they hadn’t topped themselves.” Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Haim give us their ‘palling about on Brighton Beach’ faces. Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Clattering Mississippi duo Bass Drum Of Death played The Hope. Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

The crowd go wild for a bit for a bit of Bass Drum, as they played selections from 2011’s ‘GB City’ album… Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

Australia’s Pond played Mrs Fitzherberts. Singer Nick Allbrook spent as much time in the audience on he did on stage. Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

The audience went wild for Oz quintet Pond and we can see why. Calm down ladies, etc. Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

AlunaGeorge aka Aluna Francis and George Reid, played the Coalition venue. Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Photo: Tom Martin/NME

The bands may be new, but a fish and chips on Brighton Beach is timeless – as Wet Nuns prove. Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Comeback kings Maximo Park display their refusal to let go of that hat at their Brighton Dome show. Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Paul Smith and co played a selection of tracks from their forthcoming new album ‘The National Health’ along with some old classics. Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Photo: Tom Martin/NME

South London’s Drop Out Venus played Horatio’s Bar. Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Tempestuous singer Iva Moskovich and guitarist Zaek Nakrivo were frequently seen squaring up to each other on stage. Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

The charming Citizens! played The Corn Exchange, lulling the audience into a heaving mass of bodies. Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

It might not look it, but Brighton was the indiest place in the UK at the weekend. Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Palma Violets played Horatio’s Bar and were, along with Haim and Milk Music, the buzziest band of the weekend. Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Palma Violets were not only ramshackle but brilliantly so. We called it rock and roll in its purest, drunkest form. Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

Olympia’s Milk Music played their first ever UK show on NME’s Radar stage, drawing comparisons to Thin Lizzy rather than Dinosaur Jr. Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

Milk Music played fan favourite ‘Beyond Living’, despite saying they were dropping it from their live sets. Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

Photo: Tom Martin/NME

The Temper Trap headlined The Dome, showcasing tracks from their second, self-titled album. Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Ticker tape fans Peace played The Loft playing the soul-shaking ‘Follow Baby’ as their first and last song. Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Parisian six piece La Femme played with School Is Cool and Spoek Mathambo. Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Here Grimes displays her next in an ever evolving range of image changes. Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Alabama Shakes had crowds queuing round the block before their sweat drenched performance at Komedia. Photo: Tom Martin/NME

Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

Savages played the Corn Exchange with effortless, brooding intensity. Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

Pick up NME magazine on Wednesday 16 May to read the full low-down on The Great Escape