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Photos from 'Streetstyle' by Ted Polhemus

  • A new deluxe edition of Streetstyle - Ted Polhemus's book documenting how fashion has shaped music over the years - is out now, accompanied by an exhibition. Here's one of the photos from the book, depicting hip-hop act Run DMC hanging out in Queens, New York, 1985.

    Photo: Janette Beckman/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • An exhibition of photos from the book takes place at the PYMCA gallery at London's The Book Club, from now until the end of October. This photo shows acid house fashion at its height: a sweaty raver in 'Aciiiid' T-shirt dances at the now-defunct Astoria, London, in 1988.

    Photo: David Swindells/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • First published in 1994, Streetstyle has now been translated into three languages and sold over 30,000 copies. This picture captures the rockabilly look: Boz of The Polecats warms up backstage at the Marquee, London, 14 April 1981.

    Photo:

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • A heavy metal fan photographed in Kensington Market, early 1980s.

    Photo: Ted Polhemus/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • Psychedelic iconography from the '60s, as featured in Streetstyle.

    Photo: Malcolm English

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • The new, updated edition of the book includes more recent music/fashion trends such as new-rave.

    Photo: Suzy del Campo/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • Teddy boys of The Edwardian Drape Society (T.E.D.S.), Clapham, London 1993

    Photo: Ted Polhemus/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • Cyberpunks in London. The term cyberpunk was originally coined by Bruce Bethke as the title of his short story, published in 1983. Popular with clubbers and rock fans alike, the technology-obsessed scene flourished in the late '80s and into the '90s, though was rather spoiled when Billy Idol released a crap album called 'Cyberpunk' in 1993.

    Photo: Ted Polhemus/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • Modern-day goths. Long the preserve of outsiders, goth culture has been embraced by hipsters in the 21st Century, as typified by The Horrors. Today, gloom-laden acts such as Zola Jesus are carrying the goth torch.

    Photo: Dean Chalkley/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • A pair of New Romantics, photographed in London, 1982.

    Photo: Ted Polhemus/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • Vintage revival - two women in 50's-style dresses, Viva Las Vegas Festival, Las Vegas, 2006.

    Photo: Tim Scott/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • Emo culture has come a long way from its roots in the mid-80s hardcore punk scene. Post-My Chemical Romance, it went mainstream, with stores such as Top Man stocking emo-influenced ranges. Hence the advent of the so-called "ch-emo" - a cross between a chav and an emo.

    Photo: Brian McGuinness

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • Punks in the early 1980s. How quickly this look - mohican, leather jacket, badges - was co-opted by the mainstream. No longer threatening, it soon became the stuff of cuddly postcards aimed at tourists.

    Photo: Ted Polhemus/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • More 80s rockabillies, this time on the King's Road, London.

    Photo: Ted Polhemus/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • Classic hipster fashion.

    Photo: Wayne Tippetts/PYMCA

    Added: 11 Oct 2010

  • Republished via PYMCA - the cult classic Streetstyle by Ted Polhemus.

    Photo:

    Added: 11 Oct 2010