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'Taken By Storm' - the album art of Storm Thorgerson

  • Storm Thorgerson has designed sleeves for Pink Floyd, The Mars Volta and Muse. An exhibition of his work is currently being held at the OXO Tower, London. Pictured here is the sleeve for Alan Parsons' 1993 album 'Try Anything Once'. It was shot in Spain's Larva Valley ("a magical spot", according to Storm.

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    Added: 22 May 2009

  • Catherine Wheel, 'Judy Staring At The Sun' (1993). Storm Thorgerson: "'Judy' was a single release, and the song concerned a friend of theirs who succumbed to heroin. She became isolated and detached through her addiction - entombed, as it were, in a heroin world."

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    Added: 22 May 2009

  • The Mars Volta, 'Amputechture' (2006): "The band told me the album was inspired by a story they'd seen on television about the crucifixion of a Catholic fun by fellow Catholic priests who thought her beliefs were heretical. She claimed to have visions which were god speaking to her directly. And here is her vision."

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    Added: 22 May 2009

  • Pink Floyd, 'Ummagumma' (1969). "This was the second design for Pink Floyd after 'A Saucerful Of Secrets'. It was an attempt to represent the many different layers in their music. No ephemeral pop band this, therefore no trivia, instead wheels within wheels, layers beneath layers, tunes replete with meaning and all this, for heaven's sake, in the same music."

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    Added: 22 May 2009

  • Muse, 'Supermassive Black Hole' (2006). Storm says: "This started out as four men carved from wood sitting on each other's laps. Gradually it became patterns of girls in circles, by which time the plot was lost and the band had gone off the idea. I wasn't surprised or upset, some ideas just don't make it."

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    Added: 22 May 2009

  • Pink Floyd, 'The Division Bell' (1994). Storm says: "I consider this to be one of the best things I've ever done. Not so much for the implication of a third absent face, ie that of Syd Barrett, formed by the two eyes looking at you, rather than each other, but because the statues themselves are very imposing in their own right."

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    Added: 22 May 2009

  • Led Zeppelin, 'Houses Of The Holy' (1973). "Good grief, how do you come up with ideas for the biggest band in the known universe. We shot this at the Giant's Causeway, in Northern Ireland. The weather was grey and flat so we shot it in black and white, then coloured it in by hand. It's a tad garish, if not kitsch, but mostly it works - though they didn't think so in Oklahoma, where the cover was banned."

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    Added: 22 May 2009