Pulp’s Jarvis Cocker tells Wireless Festival: ‘See you again in 15 years’

Frontman ends London festival set with puzzling send-off

Jarvis Cocker called the longevity of the Pulp reunion into question last night (July 3) at London’s Wireless Festival in Hyde Park.

After playing set-closer ‘Common People’, the Pulp frontman told the crowd: “Christmas just came early. See you all again… in about 15 years probably.”

Pulp’s reunion dates this summer – which kicked off officially with their Primavera show, and continued with their ’surprise’ performance at Glastonbury last weekend – are their first since going on hiatus since 2002. The Sheffield band’s set on Glastonbury’s Park Stage was widely hailed as one of the highlights of the festival.

Frontman Jarvis Cocker referenced that performance, pointing out that the Wireless attendees – unlike Glastonbury-goers – were the first to snap up tickets to the Pulp reunion, and hailing them as “early adopters”.

In voluble mood throughout, Cocker also referenced the fact that it was the 40th anniversary of Doors frontman Jim Morrison’s death, paying tribute to the singer before playing ‘Pink Glove’, from 1994’s ’His ’n’ Hers’ album.

Cocker also found time to hail a few celebrity birthdays, including those of Tom Cruise – mention of which drew widespread booing – and singer-songwriter Laura Branigan, who died in 2004, and whose 1982 hit ‘Gloria’ inspired the band’s ‘Disco 2000’, which they then performed.

He also made a more highbrow reference before ’This Is Hardcore’, quoting from Percy Bysshe Shelley’s 1821 poem, Adonais: An Elegy on The Death Of John Keats.

Accompanied by blasts of confetti and a backdrop spelling out the band’s name in lights, Pulp’s set featured a little less early material than their Glastonbury performance.

Pulp played:

‘Do You Remember The First Time?’
‘Pink Glove’
‘Mile End’
‘Mis-Shapes’
‘Something Changed’
‘Disco 2000’
‘Sorted For E’s And Wizz’
‘F.E.E.L.I.N.G.C.A.L.L.E.D.L.O.V.E’
‘I Spy’
‘Babies’
‘Underwear’
‘This Is Hardcore’
‘Sunrise’
‘Bar Italia’
‘Common People’