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Released: January 2000

Bobby Gillespie has long been vocal about his belief in “high energy rock’n’roll” of the type popularised by the likes of The Stooges or MC5. On this – the final single to be released by Creation Records, fact fans – he out-noised even the most abrasive moments of his idols, thanks largely to some face-meltingly intense mixing courtesy of My Bloody Valentine’s Kevin Shields (a man who knows a thing...

 
 
 

Released: July 2003

Super Furry Animals' greatest song amalgamated all their biggest strengths (slow but anthemic melodies, fist-punch choruses and techno bleep-outs) into a seven-minute wonder vastly more magic than the sum of its parts. Cian Ciaran, the dance expert in the band, built a pupil-dilating intro that built until – when played live – the band would cut in with the instruments, anthemic harmonica heralding a career...

 
 
 

Released: May 2003

As introductions go, Kings Of Leon's paean to the plights of prostitution told you everything you needed to know about the band. Four hickey rabblerousers fresh from ma's farm in the deep south and with a penchant for three minute guttural blues pop; it's as close to the Southern Strokes as they ever managed. Deftly produced, Caleb Followill's scream at roughly one minute 25 remains one of the great moments in...

 
 
 

Released: April 2002

The debut single proper from The Vines propelled Craig Nicholls and co to instant stardom in 2002. Clocking in at just one minute 34 seconds, it remains as instantly infectious now as it did upon its release. But while Nicholls' sneering vocal shows him at his nonchalant best, it's Rob Schnapf's clean-as-a-whistle production that's really clever. The man responsible for Beck's 'Loser' turns 'Highly Evolved' from a...

 
 
 

Released: September 2008

Before their obsessions with carnival rhythms and cowbells really took off, Friendly Fires had this 2007 single to propel them skywards. What's it about? Well, basically, moving to Paris and going clubbing forever. It's that simple. But more than anything, it proved that guitar bands in the noughties could 'do dance' credibly (or should that be the other way round?). The song's second half is bolstered by an...

 
 
 

Released: April 2004

It seems strange to think of it now, but when Pete Doherty released 'For Lovers' in 2003 it seemed genuinely different and exciting. Up until then, he was best known for being a podgy Julian Casablancas wannabe with a penchant for talking rubbish in interviews. But 'For Lovers' changed everything. Most of all, it made people outside The Libertines' fanbase take notice for the first time. Ironically, it wasn't even...

 
 
 

Released: July 2006

As genial and comforting as a friend’s arm round your shoulder on the night bus home as you weep into your chips, ‘Sheila’ is the male counterpart to Lily Allen’s 'LDN' – smart, warm magpie pop that could only have been made in the capital. The gentle old-school beats and the romanticism of Jamie Treays’ melody make it more than token ‘urban grittiness’, populated as it is by an array of minor city...

 
 
 

Released: August 2005

"What became of forever?" Pete Doherty asked at the tail end of The Libertines career. Here, he gave the world (and Carl Barat) his answer. How deliciously potent a message it must have been for Doherty, who by the song's release in 2005 was revelling – like a true Libertine – in the ludicrousness of his own self-propagated soap opera. Or, of course, it could just be about being a really good shag....

 
 
 

Released: August 2000

Built around Carol Williams’ 1977 Salsoul stormer ‘Love Is You’, Cristiano Spiller’s disco reanimation realised its hit potential when Sophie Ellis-Bextor – then more famous for being Janet Ellis’s daughter than her stint as singer with indie also-rans theaudience – was brought in to add some well-to-do Twickenham sang-froid. Her prim delivery rubbing up against the Chic-like chukka-chukka guitar was...

 
 
 

Released: October 2006

'Rehab' had the one-liner bellylaugh, but it was the title track to Amy Winehouse’s second album that really proved its depth and worth. Hard faced and broken-souled, its knowing wallowing spoke to anyone who’d ever had a bunnyboiler moment. It smoothly chronicled the lowest of lows (drawing on Winehouse’s first break-up with Blake Fielder-Civil) with unflinching, fierce frankness, couched by Mark Ronson’s...

 
 
 
 
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