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Released: March 2003

“You-oo… are.” You are what? “And nothing else compares.” Compares to what? Chris Martin’s lyrics might be maddeningly vague, but that’s what makes Coldplay songs so moving to so many people. Since they mean nothing, they can mean everything. And ‘Clocks’ is the sound of the band finding their voice in heroic style. After the tentative, polite sound of ‘Parachutes’, ‘Clocks’ was sleek and propulsive and confident. It was also (little-known fact!) heavily inspired by Muse’s piano-led tracks such as ‘New Born’. The stuff of endless samples and soundtracks, you’ll be hearing that circular piano riff til the day you die - so you might as well enjoy it. (LL)

 

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