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Released: May 2000

What a way to kick off the new millennium this was. It was vulgar, offensive, and it tore into just about everyone. From Pamela and Tommy Lee to Britney Spears, no one was off limits. Eminem didn’t give a shit and he told it like it was, and this one skyrocketed him into getting his first single to top the chart in the UK. Here’s to the coolest song to reference the Discovery Channel (besides The Bloodhound...

 
 
 

Released: April 1997

OK so it may not have a proper name but who cares when it had that riff? And not forgetting that drum beat and of course that immortal “woo-ooh”. ‘Beetlebum’ and the like were OK and everything, but for anyone that loved ‘There’s No Other Way’ Blur, ‘Popscene’ Blur, kick out the jams Blur, this was manna from heaven, wrapped into two minutes flat of pseudo grunge joy. The US...

 
 
 

Released: September 1997

A song that balls a lump in your throat as bulky as, say, the Manics' 'Ocean Spray', Richard Ashcroft's heart-quaking song for his father, tackling the emotion of watching him succumb to cancer, 'The Drugs Don't Work' is a thing of devastatingly downbeat beauty. No-one does cheesy worse than Richard – as everyone who's heard his 'United Nations Of Sound' album knows – but back in 1997 he was the greatest...

 
 
 

Released: July 1997

Ah, the ‘90s. Oasis’ stock was so high following ‘(What’s The Story) Morning Glory’ that they were able to get away with one of the most arrogant and overblown comeback tracks ever. Endless feedback! Morse code! Helicopters and grenades in the video! "I can't believe I wrote it, it's going to blow people away," said Noel at the time, though he later admitted it wasn’t his finest hour. It still sold...

 
 
 

Released: March 1996

The first – and arguably best – single from Beck’s breakthrough album ‘Odelay’ sees subdued Hammond synths introduce an idea-packed treat of a track that takes in all manner from samples, from obscure sex ed album ‘Sex For Teens’ to the classic Mantronix call of “we got two turntables and a microphone” and The Frogs’ “that was a good drum break”. The video, which saw Beck take...

 
 
 

Released: April 1996

I’ve written about this song so, so many times now, but still I don’t think I’ll ever be able to come close to really explaining how good it is. So let’s just say that musically and lyrically, it’s pretty damn close to perfect. It would take most people a decent-sized novel to get close to touching the subtle anger, the apt analysis of post-war social history and the flamboyant defiance that Nicky Wire...

 
 
 

Released: June 2006

On which Matt finds his funk. Inspired, according to an NME interview, by nights out in New York clubs and Franz Ferdinand’s pioneering dance-rock dalliances, it’s Muse at their most genre-bending, pulling together loose strands of R&B, robo-funk and industrial for one slinky shuffle. And it paid off, charting at Number Four and earning Muse their highest spot to date. Of course, placement on Twilight,...

 
 
 

Released: April 2003

Funny to think it now, but when Blur released this they were in choppy waters. Coxon had left and an army of new bands - Strokes, White Stripes, Libs - were finally threatening to make the old Britpop guard look utterly redundant. But then this came along - all sombre and otherworldly and different sounding, and released smack bang in the middle of the Iraq war. 'Out Of Time' seemed to sum everything up....

 
 
 

Released: September 2009

Debut smashes don't come with much more swagger and bombast than The Big Pink's breakthrough did. Constructed around a skyscraper-sized beat, the track's lyrics might be cruder than the bits that were deemed too rude for Viz magazine, but it's still stupidly catchy and hummable, as proved when Nicki Minaj's underwhelming re-telling of the hook still left you singing along. They're going to have trouble...

 
 
 

Released: August 2003

If it was brilliant at the time, it’s even more poignant now. Whilst there’s that line about how “She’ll never forgive you but she won’t let you go, oh no”, there’s no doubting that arguably The Libertines’ best song – that perfect match of sweet and scruffy – was ever about anything but Pete and Carl’s eternal, beautifully doomed romance. It’s iconic, an emblem of what was arguably...

 
 
 
 
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