Dizzee goes house! Gone is the Grime MC of ‘Boy In Da Corner’, or the cheeky chappy of ‘Dance Wiv Me’. Here instead is an Armand Van Helden collab and the best chorus about going loopy since Ozzy’s ‘Paranoid’. The bridge is almost as good as the chorus itself, as Armand drops the bass and Dizzee’s rhymes take on a slightly more sinister tone.

 
 
 

It’s tough to outdo a legend – but sorry, Mr. Sinatra, New York City’s found a new ballad dedicated to the concrete jungle. In the words of Jay-Z and Alicia, it’s the city “where dreams are made of” and it’s got “lights that will inspire you” – need we say more? Even if you’ve never been to the Big Apple, this whopper of a chorus will make you wish you had.

 
 
 

Scenic as St Albans is, Ed McFarlane and co acknowledge the draw of the city of lights, and slip into electro bliss imagining the fun they’ll have in belle Paris. With a cowbell backing, they paint a picture of hedonism and youthful indulgence, of the city beckoning them across the water as Ed sings "every city light will be out for us".

 
 
 

We all either absolutely adore ‘Umbrella’, or hate this wretched earworm so much that we run away when it pops onto any club speakers. Sure, the chorus sounds like lyrics pulled from a Disney film and repeats like a scratched record, but no matter how much hatred you may have for Rihanna’s slugger of a single, this is one chorus that will never, ever leave your head.

 
 
 

'A Rush Of Blood To The Head' cemented Coldplay’s status as a stadium-worthy group, in no small part thanks to ‘In My Place’. Sure, ‘The Scientist’ has the schmaltz factor, and ‘Clocks’ is a showy opener, but it’s ‘In My Place’, with its practical optimism, that takes gold. Martin questions "How long must you wait" for him, but we all already know the answer.

 
 
 

Stadium power ballads don’t come any more air-punching and epically jaw-clenching than the signature tune of the 1980s power-iteration of the Jefferson Airplane. The song won an Oscar, appeared on the Mannequin soundtrack, and - true fact! - was co-written by Albert Hammond, father of The Strokes guitarist.

 
 
 

Nevermind, I’ll find someone like you” Adele Adkins sings on the song which made her legend. The lengthy build-up to the chorus in the first verse sets the story in heartbreaking detail, while the chorus itself is score-settling, resigned and desperately sad. Resistance is futile, frankly.

 
 
 

With a riff that references Laura Branigan’s 80s hit ‘Gloria’, Jarvis sang of a cul-de-sac school romance with a certain ‘Deborah’. Appropriately enough the chorus resembled ‘1999’ in its perverse nostalgia for the future. When Pulp reformed in 2010, ‘Disco 2000’ became a celebration of the band getting back together - and Pulp fans were now the ones who were all “fully grown”.

 
 
 

Allegedly written about some less than wholesome groupie mischief, the chorus of New Order’s most pop-tastic moment is a sugar rush of sparkling keyboard lines, Hooky’s low slung bass line and Bernard Sumner’s laconic delivery of the lyrics (“Everything time I see you falling/I get down on my knees are pray”).

 
 
 

Weezer’s biggest pop chorus trampled on the verses' chug-rock with a bouquet of rose petal-like sentiments. “I look just like Buddy Holly/And you’re Mary Tyler Moore,” River Cuomo sings with gee schucks, Huckleberry Finn-style coyness. It's a moment where you want to take him by the neck, ruffle his hair and say "You guys!".

 
 
 
 
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