Tax breaks revealed to be the reason behind ABBA's flamboyant stage wear

The band could only get tax deductions on clothes that were "in no way suitable for everyday wear."

Tax breaks revealed to be the reason behind ABBA's flamboyant stage wear

Photo: PA

A new book has revealed that tax breaks were the reason behind ABBA's flamboyant stagewear.

Abba: The Official Photo Book - via the Express - explains that the legendary pop band wore outrageous outfits because tax deductions for performance clothes were only allowed if the items were "in no way suitable for everyday wear."

Last year Agnetha Faltskog hinted that ABBA could reform in 2014. In recent years she had been seen as the main barrier to the Swedish quartet reforming, but told German newspaper Welt Am Sonntag that she, Anni-Frid Lyngstad, Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson were considering doing something special in 2014 to mark the 40th anniversary of first hit 'Waterloo'. "Of course it's something we're thinking about," she said. "There seem to be plans to do something to mark this anniversary in some way. I can't say at this point what will come of them."

In 2008 Andersson and Ulvaeus vowed not to reform, and turned down an alleged $1billion offer in 2000 to reunite for a tour. Ulvaeus is on record saying money is not a factor in their reformation, and that he would prefer fans to remember the band as they were, "young, exuberant, full of energy and ambition."

ABBA formed in 1972, and rose to global fame after winning the Eurovision Song Contest two years later with 'Waterloo'. They soon had numerous hits to their name, and have since sold 380 million records around the world. They split in 1982 when the marriages of Agnetha and Björn, and Anni-Frid and Benny ended in divorce.

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