Arctic Monkeys' Matt Helders: 'I'd like to think we'd stop before we lost it'

Meanwhile, Alex Turner says he's not worried about burning out

Tom Oxley/NME
Photo: Tom Oxley/NME
Arctic Monkeys' Matt Helders has said he hopes the band would know when to stop if they ever lost their touch.

The Sheffield group are set to release their fifth album 'AM' next week (September 9) and, in a new interview published in this week's NME, available digitally and on newsstands now, the drummer said: "I'd like to think we'd stop before we saw it going that way [losing it]. I don't know how it would be overnight, unless one of us had some kind of scandal."

When it was suggested that bands seldom know when to call it a day, he replied: "No, I know. I mean, you can say it all you like – 'We'll stop when we're not good any more, or it's not fun, or we're not making good records.' We can say that all the time, but you probably don't know, that's the thing."

Meanwhile, singer Alex Turner dismissed fears that he could approach creative burnout. Turner, who is the only member of the group to have not had a significant break since they signed a record deal – while his bandmates enjoyed a year off in 2008, he was working with Miles Kane on their 'The Last Shadow Puppets' collaboration – said: "Maybe I'll arrive at that point sooner rather than later. To be quite honest though, it's not seemed like there's been no gaps in it, even though the albums have come out pretty quick."

Asked whether he was worried he'd lose his knack for songwriting, he said: "I don't have time to worry about that, to tell you the truth. I think there's always that thing... maybe it will just, like, disappear? And I could do some gardening or something?"

Arctic Monkeys are currently streaming their forthcoming album 'AM' online. The album, which is released on September 9, is now available to listen to via iTunes. The band's fifth studio album features the songs 'R U Mine?' and 'Do I Wanna Know?' while guests on the album include Josh Homme and former member of The Coral, Bill Ryder-Jones.

Subscribe to NME here, or get this week's digital issue


Share This

Connect With Us
This Week's Magazine