July 15, 2013 13:27

Spotify react to Atoms For Peace's claim that service is 'bad for new music'

Thom Yorke and Nigel Godrich tweeted after taking debut album 'Amok' down from streaming service

Spotify react to Atoms For Peace's claim that service is 'bad for new music'

Photo: Jenn Five/NME

Spotify has reacted to producer Nigel Godrich's announcement that Atoms For Peace's music has been removed from Spotify because, he claims, the streaming service is "bad for new music".

In a series of tweets, some of which were retweeted by his Atoms For Peace bandmate Thom Yorke, Godrich claimed the system is run by the "same old industry bods trying to get a stranglehold". He added: "The reason is that new artists get paid fuck all with this model. It's an equation that just doesn't work."

In response, a spokesperson for Spotify told NME that its long-term goal is to make sure artists are properly remunerated for putting their music on the service: "Spotify's goal is to grow a service which people love, ultimately want to pay for, and which will provide the financial support to the music industry necessary to invest in new talent and music. We want to help artists connect with their fans, find new audiences, grow their fan base and make a living from the music we all love."

The spokesperson added: "Right now we're still in the early stages of a long-term project that's already having a hugely positive effect on artists and new music. We've already paid $500 million to rightsholders so far and by the end of 2013 this number will reach $1 billion. Much of this money is being invested in nurturing new talent and producing great new music."

In a lengthy series of Twitter posts, Godrich wrote: "People are scared to speak up or not take part as they are told they will lose invaluable exposure if they don't play ball. Meanwhile millions of streams gets them a few thousand dollars. Not like radio at all." He went on to add that he thinks Spotify can be a good thing for bands with established back catalogues but does not benefit new artists. "Some records can be made in a laptop," he wrote, "but some need musicians and skilled technicians. These things cost money. Pink Floyd's catalogue has already generated billions of dollars for someone (not necessarily the band) so now putting it on a streaming site makes total sense. But if people had been listening to Spotify instead of buying records in 1973 I doubt very much if 'Dark Side...' would have been made. It would just be too expensive."

As well as the removal of 'Amok', Godrich has also removed his band Ultraista's debut album from Spotify while Thom Yorke's solo album 'The Eraser' has also been taken down from the streaming service.

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