Black Sabbath music is good for plants, says gardening expert

Heavy metallers worked wonders for blooms in an experiment

Black Sabbath music is good for plants, says gardening expert

Photo: Press

Blasting plants with Black Sabbath helps them grow and fight off disease, a gardening expert has claimed.

Chris Beardshaw, from BBC Radio 4's Gardener's Question Time, will tell listeners on Friday's programme (April 26) about his horticultural experiment which found that putting Sabbath on in a greenhouse works wonders for plants, but playing easy listening singers like Cliff Richard kills them off.

According to The Guardian, Beardshaw's test – which came about when one of his horticultural students wanted to write a dissertation on the effct of music on plants – found that rock music not only gave bigger flowers but plants that are more disease resistant.

"We set up four glasshouses with different sorts of music in to see what happened to the plants," he said. "We had one that was silent – that was a control house – and we had one that was played classical music, we had one that was played Cliff Richard and we had one that was played Black Sabbath."

"It was alstroemerias we were growing and we bombarded these glasshouses with sound for the life of the plant," he added. "The one that was grown with classical music — a soft, almost a caressing of the plant when it is hit with that sort of soundwave — those grew slightly shorter because of the soundwaves bombarding them and were slightly more floriferous and there was slightly less pest and disease."

He continued: "And the ones with Black Sabbath — great big, thumping noise, rowdy music — they were the shortest, but they had the best flowers and the best resistance to pest and disease…The alstroemerias in the Cliff Richard house all died. Sabotage was suspected but we couldn't prove it."

Last week, Black Sabbath revealed their new single 'God Is Dead?'. Scroll down to hear the song now. The 8:51 minute long song is taken the band's much-anticipated new album '13', which is due for release on June 11. The albumis the first album Osbourne, Tony Iommi and Geezer Butler have recorded together since 1978's 'Never Say Die!'.



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