Hospitalisation from taking cocaine has risen 90 percent in the last four years

"We’re already hearing that A&E and hospitals are pressured for resources, and this adds significant additional strain."

Hospitalisation linked to the use of cocaine has reportedly risen by ninety percent in the last four years.

A Freedom of Information request by Vice revealed the sharp rise in the number of in-patients who received a primary diagnosis of “mental and behavioural disorders due to use of cocaine”.

It was also revealed that the number of incidents where cocaine is mentioned in A&E departments across the UK has doubled over the same period.

Other research from the annual Crime Survey  for England and Wales reportedly shows that cocaine is second only to cannabis in the list of most commonly used illegal drugs.

Although a reason for the steep rise in hospital admissions is yet to be noted, experts say that the strength of cocaine has dramatically risen as a result in the spiralling costs of benzocaine, a cutting agent commonly used to dilute the drug.

Dr Henry Fisher , a policy director at drugs policy think-tank Volteface, told Vice: “The main reasons that people are ending up at hospital is for some kind of transient psychosis or acute toxicity, both of which are significant and challenging things to control.

“That requires a lot of resources. We’re already hearing that A&E and hospitals are pressured for resources, and this adds significant additional strain.”