Natalie Portman responds to Millie Bobby Brown being her younger lookalike

Portman says 'Stranger Things' star is "much more magical"

Natalie Portman has revealed what she thinks about people saying that Millie Bobby Brown looks like a younger version of her.

Fans have been discussing the similarities between a young Natalie Portman and Millie Bobby Brown, suggesting that they are, in fact, the same person.

Portman even spoofed Brown’s Stranger Things character Eleven in a recent Saturday Night Live sketch.

Asked about the fan theories, Portman has now told MTV News: “It’s an incredible show. I met Millie at the Golden Globes a few months ago. She came up to me and was like, ‘People keep telling me I look like the kid version of you!’.”

“I was so flattered because she’s absolutely adorable and so talented,” Portman added. “I’m like, ‘That is very nice, but I think you’re your own magical person.’ But it was fun to give a nod to that on SNL.”

“I see that there’s something there,” she continued, “but I also find her much more magical than I see myself. She’s really wonderful.”

Millie Bobby Brown has since responded to Portman’s comments, tweeting: “Was a dream come true meeting Natalie! So beautiful and talented”.

Recently, Portman opened up about enduring “sexual terrorism” after filming Leon, aged just 13.

Speaking at the Los Angeles leg of the Women’s March 2018, Portman revealed how her first fan mail involved a “rape fantasy” written by a man, that a local radio station launched a countdown to when she was “legal to sleep with” and how critics wrote about her “budding breasts” in reviews.

“At 13 years old, the message from our culture was clear to me,” Portman said. “I felt the need to cover my body and to inhibit my expression and my work in order to send my own message to the world: That I’m someone worthy of safety and respect. The response to my expression from small comments about my body to more threatening deliberate statements served to control my behaviour through an environment of sexual terrorism.”