‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’ fans go crazy after faulty projector spoils ending – watch

A screening in the US saw the movie's big twist revealed prematurely

Star Wars fans voiced their anger after a faulty projector virtually ruined the ending of new film The Force Awaken at a cinema in the US.

University Of California student Erik Melendez recently uploaded a video of cinema-goers booing and screaming “no!” after the film froze and then skipped to the end, giving away the movie’s big twist, during one screening.

Melendez wrote on Facebook: “Projector at Star Wars midnight 3D show at the Arclight ruined, stopped, then started again towards the end of the movie. The movie was spoiled and everyone in the theater went crazy.”

Watch below (spoiler-free):

Projector at Star Wars midnight 3D show at the Arclight ruined, stopped, then started again towards the end of the movie. The movie was spoiled and everyone in the theater went crazy. NBC LA ArcLight Cinemas ABC7 Disney J. J. Abrams Oscar Isaac Star Wars Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Posted by Erik Melendez on Friday, 18 December 2015

Meanwhile, analysts have put the decimation of web traffic over the last week down to Star Wars fans avoiding spoilers for The Force Awakens, which was released on Thursday (December 17).

Fans were able to watch the film from midnight on Thursday, and since the first public screenings average traffic in the UK has tumbled by 5.5%, and by 10.9% in France.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens, the seventh film in the franchise, is the first Star Wars film to be released in over ten years and has broken advance ticket sales records.

In every country that the film has now opened in, analysts say web traffic has dropped sharply as a result, and have theorised that fans are staying offline to avoid the possibility of plot spoilers for the new film.

Speaking to The Guardian, a digital strategist at cyber-monitoring firm Imperva said, “In the 12 hours after the first screenings of Star Wars in UK we noticed that traffic levels remained relatively low. This could of course be as a result of more people going to cinemas to catch other early screenings of the movie. However I do believe that this might also be a result of some fans staying offline to avoid the early morning spoilers.”

The report adds that usage was even lower during screening times, with the average traffic figure down by 8.7% in the UK during cinema hours. The news follows the creation last month of a Google Chrome app that can block spoilers on behalf of wary users.