Jack White saves Detroit Masonic Temple by paying its back taxes

He had played the venue in his hometown with The White Stripes

Jack White saves Detroit Masonic Temple by paying its back taxes

Photo: Press

Jack White has been revealed as the anonymous donor who saved the Detroit Masonic Temple from foreclosure.

White apparently paid off $142,000 (£92,798) in back taxes so his hometown venue - the world's largest Masonic Temple - could stay in business. The Detroit Free Press reports that White's mother formerly worked as an usher at the venue. White – now based in Nashville - also played the venue with The White Stripes.

The venue's 1,586 capacity Cathedral Theater will now be named the Jack White Theater to honour the star. The Detroit Masonic Temple Association President Roger Sobran stated: "Jack's donation could not have come at a better time and we are eternally grateful to him for it. Jack's magnanimous generosity and unflinching loyalty to this historic building and his Detroit roots is appreciated beyond words."

He continued: "In light of Jack's generosity and belief in the importance of a strong, vital Temple that should and will be available to future generations of Detroiters, the Masonic Temple Association will be naming, in Jack's honour, our Cathedral Theater, the Jack White Theater. We could not be more humbled to bestow this honour on Jack."

Jack White's Third Man Records recently joined forces with the legendary Sun Records label for a series of releases. Third Man reissued a number of songs from Sun's iconic back catalogue on 7" black vinyl, including Johnny Cash's 1956 single 'Get Rhythm', which was originally backed with 'I Walk The Line'. The initial three 45rpm releases will include Rufus Thomas' 'Bear Cat' and The Prisonaires' 'Just Walking In The Rain' – both originally released in 1953 – alongside the Johnny Cash reissue.

The Third Man blog says: "This will be an ongoing partnership between Sun and Third Man and future releases are already in the works." They add: "Each release remains faithful to its original issue on Sun, replicating the classic logo and label design coupled with a striking Sun company sleeve that dutifully employs the rooster Sam Philips lamented losing as labels switched from 78's to 45's."


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