Ladyhawke: 'Writing about my Asperger's syndrome was like therapy'

Singer discusses her new LP 'Anxiety'

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Ladyhawke has revealed that writing about her Asperger's syndrome on her new album 'Anxiety' was like therapy.

In an interview with the Independent, the singer said that the neurobiological disorder - which she was diagnosed with several years ago - had inspired the LP's title track and its lyric of "I take a pill to help me through the day/ I stay inside until I feel okay."

She said:

I remember writing that line thinking, 'People are going to ask me about this for sure. And I thought 'I have to do it' – it was like therapy.


She added: "I was completely dependent on taking an anti-anxiety pill to even be able to walk out of the house or sit in the car. I just couldn't do it. I'd feel sick and freak out and I'd just hate it. I can't go on the Tube, not even now. I'll always think of what could happen."

However, Ladyhawke - whose real name is Pip Brown - said she was "much better now" and confided: "A lot of people say, 'Why do you do this if you're so anxious and it's so hard for you?' Because I love it so much, making the music. The other stuff that comes with it is a small hurdle in the grand scheme of things. If I was a different person I wouldn't be Ladyhawke."

'Anxiety' is Ladyhawke's second studio album and the follow-up to her 2008 self-titled debut. The LP is set for release on June 4, but is currently streaming online in full – scroll down to the bottom of the page and click to listen.

Speaking to NME previously about the album, Ladyhawke, whose real name is Pip Brown, described it as both darker and rockier, and cited Pixies, Blur and Nirvana as her main influences during its creation. You can watch a video interview with the singer by clicking at the bottom of the page.



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