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James Murphy to turn data from US Open tennis tournament into 400 hours of new music

Musician collaborates with IBM on experimental new project

James Murphy to turn data from US Open tennis tournament into 400 hours of new music

Photo: Ben Rayner/NME

James Murphy is working on a new project which will see data gathered from this year's US Open tennis tournament turned into over 400 hours of music.

The former LCD Soundsystem frontman has teamed up with IBM for the project, titled the US Open Sessions. Each play in every match from the tournament is turned into an algorithm created by Patrick Gunderson, a developer at IBM, who has also devised a synthesizer-like interface Murphy will use to work on each component of the music.

The first of the music created by Murphy and Gunderson can be heard at the US Open Sessions website with uploads arriving in short and long versions after every game until the women and men's finals on September 7 and 8 respectively. In addition, Murphy will also create 14 remixes, based on moments from the tournament including weather changes and crowd reactions.

Speaking about the project to in a video you can watch below, Murphy describes it as "a hard project", but "kind of exciting". He then added: "We're going to generate almost 400 hours worth of music, but I'm not going to sit there and play 400 hours of music, just so you know. I'm setting up a machine to do that."



This latest project follows the announcement that Murphy will collaborate with Noah Baumbach again to write the score for the director's new film, While We're Young.

Back in February, Murphy also revealed a brief preview of his plan to make every New York subway station have its own music, so that people will later associate each location with a specific sound.



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