The singer started seeing a therapist after feeling suicidal recording in 1982's 'Nebraska', according to a report

Bruce Springsteen suffered from depression and suicidal thoughts in the 80s, a new profile has revealed.

According to the New Yorker, Springsteen experienced serious intervals of depression while finishing his 1982 album ‘Nebraska’ and subsequently started seeing a psychotherapist.

“He was feeling suicidal” Springsteen’s friend and biographer Dave Marsh said. “The depression wasn’t shocking, per se. He was on a rocket ride, from nothing to something, and now you are getting your ass kissed day and night. You might start to have some inner conflicts about your real self-worth.”

“My issues weren’t as obvious as drugs,” Springsteen said. “Mine were different, they were quieter – just as problematic, but quieter. With all artists, because of the undertow of history and self-loathing, there is a tremendous push toward self-obliteration that occurs onstage.”

He added: “It’s both things: there’s a tremendous finding of the self while also an abandonment of the self at the same time. You are free of yourself for those hours; all the voices in your head are gone. Just gone. There’s no room for them. There’s one voice, the voice you’re speaking in.”

Earlier this week, Springsteen’s bandmate Steven Van Zandt told Rolling Stone that The Boss’ clean-living lifestyle was the reason he was still performing three-and-a-half-hour sets at the age of 62.

“He’s in good shape by not doing drugs. It’s something he doesn’t have to preach about. He’s a living example of what happens when you never do drugs your whole life,” he said.

He added: “I mean, I’m sure he’s taken a drink or two a few times in his life, but he was never a drinker either. And he eats right and he’s in the gym. Well, that’s what happens. Don’t do drugs. Don’t drink, eat right, go to the gym and you can rock & roll at 62, too. It isn’t rocket science. This is real old fashioned common sense.”

Earlier this month (July 19), Springsteen hit back at organisers of Hard Rock Calling, after the plug was pulled on his set during a duet with Paul McCartney on Saturday (July 14). Taking to the stage at a gig in Dublin on Tuesday (July 17), the singer came on stage with a huge power generator prop and said: “Before we were so rudely interrupted…” before launching into the last minute of ‘Twist And Shout’, the song he was playing with Paul McCartney when the power was cut in Hyde Park.