Dave Grohl unsure when he’ll be able to play gigs out of his throne: ‘It’s the star of the show’

Frontman has played gigs in custom-built chair since breaking his leg in June

Dave Grohl has said that he is reluctant to cease performing live in his custom-built throne, saying it has become the “star of the show” in recent months.

Grohl has been performing Foo Fighters gigs from an elaborate chair since breaking his leg at a gig in Sweden earlier this year. The injury forced the band to axe their Glastonbury headline set and Grohl can only play with the band as long as his leg is elevated.

Speaking to the Hollywood Reporter, Grohl said he is recovering well but does not know when he’ll be ready to get rid of the throne and stand on his own two feet.

“It’s become the star of the show. It has a drink holder,” he said, adding, “Do I stop using it when I can just stand there? Or do I stop using it when I can jump and run around like I used to or do I keep it for fucking ever?”

NMEGetty

It is unclear whether Grohl will remain in the throne when Foo Fighters return to the UK in September.

The band were forced to scrap their European tour in June when Grohl sustained his broken leg. UK gigs in London and Edinburgh were cancelled, along with a headline slot at Glastonbury Festival.

Foo Fighters will play two shows at Milton Keynes Bowl on September 5 and 6, with Iggy Pop supporting the band at the gigs. They will also play Edinburgh’s Murrayfield Stadium on September 8, where Royal Blood will open.

In addition to the throne, Foo Fighters have brought members of the audience onstage to perform on a number of occasions in recent months, including inviting a fan up to cover Rush’s ‘Tom Sawyer’ in Edmonton on August 13.

Last month the band invited Anthony Bifolchi to play drums on ‘Big Me’ at a gig in Toronto.

In May, Foo Fighters also brought an eight-year-old fan onstage to duet on ‘Times Like These’ at Old Trafford after Grohl spotted him singing the 2002 single.
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