Iron Maiden’s Bruce Dickinson thinks ‘we’re only a heartbeat away from Auschwitz’

The singer was commenting on the state of the modern world.

Iron Maiden singer Bruce Dickinson has spoken out about the state of humans in the 21st century.

In an interview with Newsweek, he was discussing the former Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz, which the band visited while performing in Polands’ Wroclaw on their 1984 Powerslave tour.

“It’s a very spooky place,” he said.

“The Polish guy who showed us around, he goes there all the time, and I was like, ‘How can anybody do that?’ I couldn’t be there for more than a couple of hours. It really did my head in. You can smell the evil of the place.”

Referring to the current world situation, he said: “We think we’re all modern 21st-century human beings, but we’re only a heartbeat away from Auschwitz, and not just with Jewish people.

“There’s an equivalent going on somewhere in the world, every single day. You think, ‘At what point do we start to evolve?’ And then something crazy happens, like Las Vegas, and it makes you wonder, ‘What is it with human beings? Are we all capable of doing that?'”

Dickinson wrote about Auschwitz in his memoir, ‘What Does This Button Do?’, which came out back in October.

Bruce Dickinson’s autobiography, released in October

“It is the banality of industrial execution planning contrasted with the screams of the gas chambers that is the true measure of the terror,” he wrote.

“That terror, I believe, is the secret fear that we may all be such monsters deep down. It makes me shudder even to think it… I cried a lot after the visit.”

The singer spoke to NME ahead of the release of the book  in October, opening up being diagnosed with cancer, and the future of Iron Maiden.

Back in May, the singer shared his thoughts on the Manchester terror attack, during an Iron Maiden performance at London’s O2 Arena.

Speaking ahead of the track ‘The Book Of Souls’, Dickinson declared: “You’re all aware of everything that happened the other week. There’s no point going over it, it’s shit, it’s awful, it’s terrible and we’re not going to have any one minute’s silence or anything else like that.

“[Instead] We should make some fucking noise and celebrate the joy and say fuck these people.”