Jack White’s Third Man Records announces Standing Rock school partnership

The artist's label will support the school during the current protests against the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline

Jack White‘s label, Third Man, has announced a new partnership with a school at the Standing Rock protests in the US.

The school, The Defenders of the Water, is located in the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ Camp at Standing Rock in South Dakota, which serves the children of the families who are currently camped in the “water protectors’ camp community.” The camps have sprung up in protest against the controversial building of the $3.7bn Dakota Access Pipeline, which would transport crude oil from North Dakota to Illinois. The protests been fronted by the local Sioux tribe, as well as thousands of Native American supporters from across the continent.

As Pitchfork reports, the book and record divisions of the White Stripes‘ frontman’s label are working together to benefit The Defenders of the Water School at Standing Rock. The Third Man Books site will feature work created by students and volunteers from the school, which aims to “allow the students’ voices to be heard the world over.” Third Man Records are also selling a special shirt, with proceeds from sales set to go towards supporting the school programme at the Očhéthi Sakówiŋ Camp. You can buy the shirt and find out more information about the project here.

White is the latest musician to voice his support for the Standing Rock protests. Yesterday, members from Radiohead, Green Day and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs all signed Kate Nash‘s open letter to President Obama about the treatment of protestors of the pipeline across the US.

“We are deeply disturbed by the police actions that have been taking place, where non violent protests have been and continue to be met with extremely aggressive tactics including; being shot with water canons in below freezing temperatures, chemical weapons, rubber bullets, and attack dogs,” the letter reads. “These are the same inhumane methods used during WWII and the Civil Rights Movement.”