Las Vegas festival shooting victims file lawsuit against organisers

Music promotions company Live Nation is among those facing legal action

Victims of the Las Vegas mass shooting have filed lawsuits at Los Angeles Superior Court – with festival promotions company Live Nation among those being sued.

October 1 saw a mass shooting take place at the Route 91 Harvest festival in Las Vegas, claiming the lives of 59 people and leaving countless others injured.  Stephen Paddock, 64, opened fire from a room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino, targeting music fans at the country music festival.

Now, as reported by NPR,  hundreds of victims have filed lawsuits, claiming negligence by promotors Live Nation – along with MGM Resorts International and the owner of the Mandalay Bay Hotel. A lawsuit has also been filed against shooter Stephen Paddock’s estate.

Plaintiffs say that Live Nation – who promoted the Country music festival – failed to provide enough emergency exits or trained employees who could cope with “a foreseeable event, such as a terrorist attack or other emergency”.

 MGM have also been accused of not having adequate security measures in place, not training staff properly and not surveilling the premises sufficiently.

While Live Nation declined to comment, MGM said in a statement to NPR: “The incident that took place on October 1st was a terrible tragedy perpetrated by an evil man. These kinds of lawsuits are not unexpected and we intend to defend ourselves against them. That said, out of respect for the victims, we will give our response through the appropriate legal channels.”

In the days following the attack, festival organisers issued a statement which read: “While we will try and move forward, we will never forget this day. We will not let hate win over love. We will not be defeated by senseless violence. We will persevere, and honour the souls that were lost. Because it matters.”

Following the shooting, musicians such as Lady Gaga, Ariana Grande and Moby joined calls for stricter gun control in the US.