The singer's is reported to have gone 60 days without proper sleep

Dr Charles Czeisler, a sleep expert, has told jurors during Michael Jackson‘s wrongful death trial that the superstar may have been the first person on record to go for 60 days without proper sleep, reports The Sun.

Jackson’s personal doctor Conrad Murray is said to have administered Jackson with a dangerous sedative called Propofol in order to induce sleep for two months. Propofol is said to induce a coma-like state rather than allowing the patient to engage in a natural sleeping condition.

Czeisler went on to elaborate that Jackson’s symptoms (such as forgetting words to songs and being unable to carry out simple dance moves) were “consistent with someone suffering total sleep deprivation over a chronic period”. He also went on to suggest that, if the singer had not been killed by an overdose of the drug, he would have died from a lack of sleep.

This is the latest update in the ongoing trial, in which Jackson’s family are suing AEG concerts (who employed Murray) for $26billion.

Earlier this year it was also stated that a lawyer for AEG called Jackson a “freak” on the day he signed a multimillion dollar contract to perform a series of comeback concerts. Brian Parnish, the attorney for Jackson’s mother Katherine, explained that the statement “just exemplifies that AEG had no respect for Mr. Jackson. All he was was a vehicle to make money and to promote their concert business to catch up with Live Nation.” The lawsuit is based around the claim that AEG were negligent in hiring COnrad Murray, who was later convicted of killing the pop superstar.

The case also took a bizarre turn this month when AEG CEO Randy Philipps testified that he had had talks with Jackson’s ghost. Claiming that his friend, Lionel Ritchie’s wife Brenda, had been in contact with the spirit, he stated that “Brenda called me to tell me that she was in communications with Michael either through a medium or directly. She said Michael told her that it wasn’t Dr Murray’s fault, that he had accidentally killed himself.” Despite the unlikely nature of the testimony, the judge allowed the explanation to stand.

The trial began on April 29 and is set to conclude next month.