Queen’s ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ has been reinterpreted into ballet – watch

The English National Ballet, Royal Academy of Music and Trinity Boys Choir make it their own

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’, the Queen track has been reinterpreted by the English National Ballet, Royal Academy of Music and Trinity Boys Choir.

Footage of two ballet dancers, the choir and a string quartet from RAM can be seen cut with the original video for ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ and clips of the band’s performance of the song on Christmas Eve, 1975.

The single, which was released on Halloween (October 31) in 1975, became Christmas Number One by the end of the year and again reached UK Number One in 1991 when it was re-released.

Watch the reinterpretation below:

Queen’s guitairst Brian May has said of the 40th anniversary of the single, “We all realised it was something wonderful and we should give it our heart and soul,” he told BBC News.

“The heavy bit was a great opportunity for us to be at full pelt as a rock band. But that big, heavy riff came from Freddie [Mercury], not me. That was something he played with his left hand in octaves on the piano. So I had that as a guide – and that’s very hard to do, because Freddie’s piano playing was exceptional, although he didn’t think so.”

May added of the song’s ambiguous lyrics: “I do think Freddie enjoyed the fact there were so many interpretations of the lyrics. It’s an outlandish song. I think it’s beyond analysis. That’s not me trying to be evasive. I just think that’s why we love songs – they can do something to us that a piece of text can’t.”

Despite four decades passing since its original release, May states that he’s still “not sick of it”: “You can’t complain that people want to talk about it all these years later. I still enjoy hearing it. If it comes on the radio, I’ll turn it up and listen. But no air guitar. I’m too old for air guitar now.”