Radiohead play ‘Creep’ at Glastonbury – fans react

Band delivered a rare performance of their most famous track

Radiohead offered up a rare rendition of ‘Creep’ during their Glastonbury Festival headline set.

The band have often had a tumultuous relationship with the most famous track. While it found them huge rock radio and mainstream success upon release in 1993, Radiohead have been reluctant to play it live over the years – citing that it took on a life of its own, separate to the breakthrough success and critical acclaim of their material since.

Fans have been reacting to the band’s Glasto performance of ‘Creep’. One Twitter user wrote: “Not only are Radiohead playing ‘Creep’, but it actually looks like they practiced it beforehand”.

Another added that frontman Thom York was “coming to terms” with the song “being a banger”.

See more reactions below.

Radiohead played the following songs in total:

Daydreaming
Lucky
Ful Stop
Airbag
15 Step
Myxomatosis
Exit Music (for a Film)
Pyramid Song
Everything in Its Right Place
Let Down
Bloom
Weird Fishes/Arpeggi
Idioteque
You and Whose Army?
There There
Bodysnatchers
Street Spirit (Fade Out)
No Surprises
Nude
2 + 2 = 5
Paranoid Android
Fake Plastic Trees
Lotus Flower
Creep
Karma Police

“It’s a good song,” guitarist Ed O’Brien said of ‘Creep’ in a recent interview with Rolling Stone. “It’s nice to play for the right reasons. People like it and want to hear it. We do err towards not playing it because you don’t want it feel like show business. But we started throwing it in last year.”

Frontman Thom Yorke added: “We only did it once or twice this year,” said the frontman. “The first time I’m feeling the fakes we’ll stop. It can be cool sometimes, but other times I want to stop halfway through and be like, ‘Nah, this isn’t happening.’”

Radiohead’s set consisted heavily of ‘OK Computer’ favourites, while frontman Yorke also appeared to mock Theresa May’s “strong and stable” motto.

Later on, Yorke appeared to join in when the crowd began to chant about Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.