Shame call Amber Rudd a ‘fuckin weapon’

Home Secretary has been urged to stand down by Labour over the Windrush scandal

Shame have hit out at Home Secretary Amber Rudd, branding her a ‘fuckin weapon’.

The South London band, who have quickly gained momentum after the release of their debut album ‘Songs Of Praise’ earlier this year, took to Twitter to criticise the under fire Cabinet minister.

Rudd has been at the centre of the recent Windrush row which erupted after it emerged relatives of migrants from Commonwealth Caribbean countries who settled in the UK from the late 1940s to the 1970s had been declared illegal immigrants if they could not provide a range of documentation proving they had lived in the UK continuously.

Some have been threatened with deportation, lost their jobs or been refused access to medical treatment.

Labour has also urged the Home Secretary to quit over the scandal.

Meanwhile, Shame frontman Charlie Steen recently opened up to NME about his mental health and the struggles that come with the pressures of being in a touring band.

“Any band that has to endure the mental strain of sleep deprivation and constant moving will experience that,” he said. “We gigged and gigged until it broke us – and it eventually broke my mind.”

He goes on to discuss the pressures of touring, adding that “this must be one of the only professions in the world where you’ll be shivering in the corner, you’ve thrown up 12 times in one day and you’re basically on the verge of tears – and then a promoter pokes you in the chest and says, ‘Go onstage, monkey, go onstage.’”

Of Shame’s debut album, NME‘s Jordan Bassett wrote: “The London five-piece is audibly indebted to Smith’s revered Manchester post-punk group The Fall – louche vocal delivery, abrasive and atonal guitar and barbed lyrics all present and correct – but debut album ‘Songs Of Praise’ courses with venom and a lithe vigour that is all their own.”

“Along with HMLTD and INHEAVEN, the band belongs to a fertile south London scene that lays waste to the myth that guitar music is no longer a place for innovation, excitement and – in Shame’s case – lyrics that splat in your earholes like lumps of hot, rotten fruit.”

“This is a band with a real sense of showmanship, as those who have witnessed Shame’s sweat-slicked live shows will know. It’s this that makes ‘Songs Of Praise’ utterly invigorating.”