Watch St Vincent call out stupid interview questions in comedy videos

The shorts were directed by Carrie Brownstein

St Vincent has shared a series of comedy clips that see her fielding common and inane interview questions.

The musician – real name Annie Clark – recently shared her video for new single ‘New York’, taken from her as-yet-to-be-announced sixth album, the follow-up to her self-titled record and NME’s 2014 album of the year.

These new videos, posted to Instagram, see Clark sardonically answering questions like “What is it like to perform in high heels?” and “Are St Vincent and Annie Clark the same person?”

According to a recent New Yorker profile, the shorts were scripted by Sleater-Kinney musician and Portlandia star Carrie Brownstein.

Watch beneath:

A post shared by St. Vincent (@st_vincent) on

A post shared by St. Vincent (@st_vincent) on

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A post shared by St. Vincent (@st_vincent) on

A post shared by St. Vincent (@st_vincent) on

A post shared by St. Vincent (@st_vincent) on

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Clark’s recent ‘New York’ video was directed by visual artist Alex Da Corte. It was the first music video he has ever made. “I think Annie’s New York is the New York of my dreams-one that is blurry and fractured, dreamy and flat,” said Da Corte of the video. “It is the Toontown to my Hollywood.  It is beautiful but slightly out of reach.”

Dissecting the track for Song Exploder, Clark recently discussed the lyric “I have lost a hero”, describing it as being about “our collective heroes” but also being “very personal”.

She explained: “2016 was like the Earth was like, ‘Let’s purge the Earth of geniuses.’ It’s very silly to make something like David Bowie’s death about me. I mean, it has nothing to do with me, but I will say I was really affected and I cried – I cried for somebody I didn’t even know. I don’t know if I’ve done that before.

“A lot of people were affected by his death. [It was like], ‘You can’t die.’ And then Prince a few months later, and then Leonard Cohen. It was just like, ‘What in the world is going on?’ But [the song isn’t] just about our big heroes.”