Music world reacts in sadness to Britain leaving the EU

Johnny Marr says: ‘I’ve never been more happy to be in the minority’

Musicians have begun reacting to the news that Britain has voted to leave the European Union.

The Leave campaign won by a majority of 52%-48% against the Remain alliance to quit the EU. The result has triggered huge financial uncertainty, with the Pound at its lowest level since 1985. Residents of Scotland and Northern Ireland voted in favour of Remain, leaving political leaders in those countries to state that they could be seeking further referenda on voting to become independent.

The results came after it was revealed that a substantial majority of people aged 18-24 voted in favour of Remain, with 75% of voters in that age group voting Remain compared to 39% of voters aged 65 and above.

By 7am, many artists had already begun expressing their horror at the result. Johnny Marr tweeted: “I have never been more happy to be in the minority,” adding in a separate tweet: “No-one ever said that the majority know what they’re doing. All the more reason for the rest of us to stick together.” Read the NME’s report here for a list of musicians who were in favour of Remain.

The Chemical Brothers’ Ed Simons wrote: “Incredulous, sad, scared and angry…. Cannot take this in,” adding: “Unbelievable scenes of stupid old people proclaiming a victory whilst their savings, pensions and property are wiped out. Idiots.” Years & Years singer Olly Alexander simply tweeted: “Fuck.”

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling wrote: “I don’t think I’ve ever wanted magic more,” adding: “Scotland will seek independence now. Cameron’s legacy will be breaking up two unions. Neither needed to happen.” Belle And Sebastian singer Stuart Murdoch added his view that Scotland would seek independence, writing: “Sad, sad, sad. Europe, I don’t think the people of Scotland will be long away from you. Perhaps this is a new beginning.”

Peep Show actor Robert Webb, an active Labour Party campaigner, quoted a chart breaking down how people voted by age groups and wrote: “This is the heartbreaking part of it. Sorry, kids. England’s dreaming again. Chin up, let’s see what we can do.”

Lily Allen said: “Well, millennials. We’re really, really fucked. How’s that stronger NHS and economy looking. I’ve been crying since Swindon, not even joking.”

The vast majority of musicians who expressed their opinion were in favour of Remain, with The Who singer Roger Daltrey and Iron Maiden vocalist Bruce Dickinson among those who backed Leave.

Cher appeared to back Leave, tweeting what seemed a celebratory emoji after a tweet saying: “It’s best decision for all UK people.” However, she then emphasised that she meant: “I pray it’s best decision for all UK people.”