A study by Liverpool John Moores University has found that booze-related lyrics have doubled in the past decade

A new study by Liverpool John Moores University has found that, on average, one in five songs in the UK Top 10 contains references to alcohol.

The Telegraph reports that the study, which was published in the Psychology of Music journal, has found that the number of booze references in chart hits has doubled over the past decade, partly due to US tracks cracking the UK charts.

The study states that this exposure of young music fans to alcohol is troubling, and explained that people should make sure that this exposure to alcohol should not “extend[ing] cultures of intoxication and alcohol-related harm.” They commented: “A greater understanding of the impacts of alcohol-related popular music content on young listeners is urgently needed… Health and other professionals should be vigilant for increases in alcohol-related lyrics and work to ensure that popular music does not become a medium for reinforcing and extending cultures of intoxication and alcohol-related harm.”

The study looked at four decades of chart hits, with very few songs in 1981 mentioning alcohol, and even less in 1991. However, in 2001 8% of chart songs mentioned drinking and in 2011 this was up to 18.5%.