July 12, 2013 12:24

Playing Nirvana, Metallica, Madonna to IVF eggs increases chances of fertilisation, study claims

Spanish scientists also played Michael Jackson, Vivaldi and Bach to the eggs via iPods

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Spanish researchers have found that playing the music of Nirvana, Metallica and Madonna to IVF eggs increases their chances of fertilisation by five per cent.

Scientists from Barcelona's Marques Institute fertility clinic revealed their findings at the annual conference of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in London earlier this month. After injecting nearly 1,000 eggs with sperm, they placed them all in incubators with iPods playing music to half of them. The iPods played a selection of music, including songs by Nirvana, Metallica, Michael Jackson and Madonna, as well as classical pieces by Bach, Vivaldi and Mozart.

The eggs, which were placed in the incubators with iPods, had a five per cent higher rate of fertilisation. It is thought that the vibrations created by the music help the passage of nutrients into the egg and also assist with the removal of toxic waste, reports the Daily Mail.

Oxford University fertility expert Dr Dagan Wells commented that techno music could be the best for helping with fertilisation because of its "pounding bass". He said: "Embryos produced using IVF sit on a dish, stewing in their own juices but those produced naturally are wafted down the fallopian tubes, rocking and rolling all their way to the uterus. This movement means that the embryo experiences a very dynamic environment, which may have some advantages, particularly in terms of getting rid of waste products. The vibrations caused by music may stimulate this effect. One might speculate that techno music, with its pounding bass beat, might do the best job of all."

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