Pussy Riot say they still want to topple Vladmir Putin

Punk collective say their attitude has 'not changed' towards Russian President

Video: EXCLUSIVE - Pussy Riot's Maria Alyokhina Talks To NME From Prison

Pussy Riot have vowed that they still want to topple Russian President Vladmir Putin.

Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova were released from prison under a new amnesty law on December 23. The feminist punk collective's members were given two-year sentences in August 2012 after their now infamous "punk prayer" protest at Moscow's Cathedral Of Christ The Savior. They were taken to a prison camp in Berniki in the remote Ural Mountains.

As the Daily Telegraph reports, the pair insisted during a press conference that they are still determined to take on Putin. Tolokonnikova said: "Our attitude to Vladimir Putin has not changed. We’d like to do what we said in our last action - we’d like him to go away.

"Vladimir Putin is a very closed, opaque chekist [Russian slang for secret policeman]. He is very much afraid. He builds walls around him that block out reality," she added. "Many of the things he said about Pussy Riot were so far from the truth, but it was clear he really believed them. I think he believes that Western countries are a threat, that it's a big bad world out there where houses walk on chicken legs and there is a global masonic conspiracy. I don't want to live in this terrifying fairytale."

Recently, Alyokhina and Tolokonnikova revealed that they would be starting a non-governmental human rights group called Zona Prava - Justice Zone, instead of engaging in activism under the name Pussy Riot. The pair also said that they are hoping to work with Russian oil tycoon and critic of the Kremlin Mikhail Khodorkovsky on Zona Prava, and will be focusing on human rights issues over political activity.

BLOG: Pussy Riot Prove That Protest Rock Is Alive And Kicking


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