Radiohead stage collapse kills drum technician

Further three people injured, one seriously, as Toronto show is cancelled

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Radiohead's drum technician, Scott Johnson, has been named as the man who died after a stage collapsed before the band's concert in Toronto last night (June 16).

A relative confirmed to the BBC that the 33-year-old from Doncaster had died when the roof of the stage fell on top of him.

A further three people are injured, with one reported to be in a serious condition, in the incident at Downsview Park. Scroll down the page and click to view footage, shot from a helicopter, of the aftermath.

The stage collapsed an hour before the gates opened to the public and queues were already forming outside the venue. Emergency crews were quick on the scene and the area was evacuated. The victims were all part of the team setting up equipment.

Speaking to the BBC, Alexandra Halbert, who was working in a nearby beer tent at the time of the collapse, said she heard a noise "that sounded like fireworks".

She continued: "I turned around and the whole top part of the stage had collapsed, as well as the scaffolding. It seemed like there were a couple of minutes of hesitation and no one knew quite what to do. It was only afterwards that we all realised how serious it was."

Radiohead later announced on their Twitter that the show would be cancelled and advised fans to stay away from Downsview Park.

They Tweeted:



Dan Snaith, who goes by the name Caribou, was due to support Radiohead last night at the show. He posted his sympathy towards those affected by the incident on his Twitter profile.

He Tweeted:



40,000 people were expected to attend the sold-out show in the Canadian city. Police are now investigating the cause of the stage collapse and have appealed for witnesses to come forward to speak to them.


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