November 23, 2012 20:09

John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison's first recording named Britain's rarest record

The Quarry Men acetate is valued at £200,000

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A 1958 recording by The Quarry Men has been named Britain's rarest record.

The 'That'll Be The Day'/'In Spite of All the Danger' acetate has been valued at £200,000 and features the talents of Paul McCartney, John Lennon and George Harrison, later of The Beatles, as well as John 'Duff' Lowe on piano and Colin Hanlon on drums.

The record ended up in the possession of Lowe after The Quarry Men split and is, according to Record Collector magazine - via The Guardian - Britain's rarest record.

The UK's second rarest record is the 1981 replica of the same 1958 Quarry Men recording, which was made by Paul McCartney. Only 20-25 copies were made and they are worth £10,000 a piece.

Lowe sold the original and McCartney took it to Abbey Road Studios to make copies, which went to all the surviving members of The Beatles for Christmas.

Records by the Sex Pistols are the third, fourth and fifth rarest records in the UK, with the 1977 acetate of 'God Save The Queen'/'No Feelings' valued at £10,000.

The fourth rarest record is the 1977 vinyl of 'God Save The Queen'/'No Feelings' on A&M. 20,000 copies were pressed but most were destroyed.

The fifth rarest record is the 1977 acetate of 'Anarchy In The UK'/'No Fun', which is valued at £7,000. There are only three known copies of this record.

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