The Black Crowes frontman brands The Rolling Stones fans 'rock 'n' roll tourists'

Frontman Chris Robinson compares watching the Stones to going to 'Disneyland'

The Black Crowes frontman brands The Rolling Stones fans 'rock 'n' roll tourists'

Photo: PA

The Black Crowes frontman Chris Robinson has criticised The Rolling Stones recent live performances, taking specific aim at Mick Jagger.

Robinson said that Jagger lacked "sincerity" during the band's five arena dates, which took place towards the end of 2012. Speaking to the Evening Standard, the US singer said: "Bands the size and scale of the Stones - they're like Disneyland. I felt like the audience at those shows were rock 'n' roll tourists. I wish Mick had a little more sincerity and did a little bit less running around." Robinson didn't make it clear if he'd actually attended any of The Rolling Stones' live dates.

The rock legends' sell-out shows in London on November 25 and 29, 2012 shifted as many as 31,755 tickets. Their US dates at Brooklyn's new Barclays Center on December 8 as well as a two-show stint on December 13 and 15 at the Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey, pushed the total number of tickets sold to 364,864 over all five dates. Over the five dates, the band were joined by a cast and crew of artists including Florence Welch, Mary J Blige, Lady Gaga and The Black Keys.

Earlier this year, The Rolling Stones' Ronnie Wood promised that he would be twisting his bandmate's arms into playing this years' Glastonbury. The Stones have been heavily tipped to make their debut on the Pyramid Stage this year. When asked about it, Wood replied: "We've got a meeting next month and that's going to be my first question to them. It's something I've always been interested in. I'm going to twist their arms. I've got lots of high hopes this year, now that we're all rehearsed - let's get it cracking this summer!"

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