Martin Freeman says fan expectations are taking the fun out of ‘Sherlock’

The future of the popular BBC adaptation is still uncertain

Martin Freeman has revealed that working on Sherlock isn’t as fun as it used to be due to fan expectations.

A new series of Sherlock has yet to be confirmed since the most recent episode aired last year.

Speaking to The Telegraph, Freeman said there’s not been any conversations about returning for Season Five.

“I think after series 4, [it] felt like a pause. I think we felt we’d done it for a bit now,” he added. “And part of it, speaking for myself, is [due to] the reception of it.

“People’s expectations, some of it is not fun any more. It’s not a thing to be enjoyed, it’s a thing of, ‘You better f**king do this, otherwise you’re a c**t’. That’s not fun anymore.”

He added that fan’s expectations made it difficult for the show to continue to succeed.

“To be absolutely honest, it was kind of impossible,” he explained. “Sherlock became the animal that it became immediately, whereas even with The Office, it was a slow burn.

“But Sherlock was frankly notably high quality from the outset. And when you start [that high], it’s pretty hard to maintain that.”

Last summer, Sherlock co-creator Mark Gatiss has hinted that the show may never return to the small screen as “it’s a nightmare to schedule.”

Speaking to the UKTV podcast A Stab In The Dark, Gatiss again expressed his frustrations with being unable to align the schedules of Sherlock‘s two main stars, Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman.

“It’s not lack of will – it’s a nightmare to schedule,” Gatiss said. “It was very, very hard to schedule the last series, because of Martin and Benedict’s availability. And Steve [Moffat, co-creator]’s and mine.

“There is always that Fawlty Towers principle of, ‘Let’s just leave it,’” he continued about Sherlock‘s future. “We’ve had the keys to Baker Street for a while, but one of the wonderful things is that they’re always shared. They were shared while we were making it.

“There’s nothing wrong with saying, ‘That was our version, somebody out there go and do their version.’”