NME.COM

Parental advisory warning to extend to music downloads

The scheme flags up strong language, sexual and violent content for buyers

The 'parental advisory' scheme, which warns shoppers about explicit content in songs, will be extended to music sold and streamed online.

The warnings over strong language and violent or sexual content will now be attached to music and video files being sold through the likes of iTunes, Amazon and HMV.

Run by the British Phonographic Industry since 1995, the scheme has applied to physical music sales, but will now be applied to music downloads and also online streams. The campaign is being backed by singer Jamelia, who has said:
As a parent, naturally I worry about whether my kids are viewing and listening to appropriate content when they're online, but without some form of guidance it can be almost impossible to stay on top of what's suitable and what's not.

She added: "I think parents would agree that having the same logo for online music services that we're used to seeing in the high street gives parents the ability to quickly and easily judge whether a song or music video is right for their child."

Her comments were backed by the chief executive of the British Phonographic Industry, Geoff Taylor, who, reports The Telegraph, said: "We believe that parents need the same guidance when their children are downloading or streaming songs or videos online, so we have extended the logo to digital music services."

Share This

Connect With Us
This Week's Magazine