January 31, 2013 13:01

Ticketmaster changes 'hated' security check system

'Hated' Captcha verification system finally gets ditched

Ticketmaster changes 'hated' security check system
Ticketmaster has announced plans to simplify the process of booking tickets online, calling an end to the infuriating process of typing text from two barely legible, random words in order to proceed with a booking.

The current system is being ditched for a more user friendly service.

While the typing phrases method hasn't been completely ditched, the new version created by New York start-up Solve Media, will see users having to type phrases, such as "freezing temperatures", rather than "tormentis harlory".

Aaron Young, from user experience consultancy Bunnyfoot, told BBC News:

It [the current system] is generally speaking the one of the most hated pieces of user interaction on the web. The major problem with them is that it's not unusual for several attempts to be needed. So when people see them again on different websites they have negative expectations.

The original version, known as Captcha, was first developed at Carnegie Mellon university in 2000. It's purpose was to eradicate 'bots' trying to cheat the system and beat queues of real people to tickets.

Trials of the new system had shown positive signs, according to Ticketmaster. Kip Levin, Ticketmaster's executive vice-president of eCommerce, said:"We're starting to see an uptick in fan satisfaction. We're happy with what we've seen from a security standpoint as well."

He added that the average time to solve a Captcha puzzle was 14 seconds, while the new system was taking users an average of seven seconds to figure out.

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