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50 things you didn't know about The Stone Roses

  • John Squire was inspired to pick up a guitar after hearing the Sex Pistols 'Anarchy In The UK'.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • When the band launched into the offices of FM Revolver with tins of paint in protest at the unauthorised reissue of 'Sally Cinnamon' they caused £23,000 worth of damage.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • The floppy discs on the 'Begging You' single cover were supposed to teach John Squire how to work a bunch of sequencers but he got pissed off, knackered the lot, plastered and daubed paint over them. Hey presto! Art.

    Photo: Amy Brammall/NME

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Middlesbrough author Richard Milward named his second novel Ten Storey Love Song after the Roses track of the same name. Obviously.

    Photo: Getty

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Once they'd wriggled out of their Silvertone/Zomba contract in spring 1991, the Roses reportedly signed for US major Geffen for $20 million. There was an advance of around $2.3 million too. Suitably enthused, they then, erm, knuckled down to that second album.

    Photo: Andy Willsher/NME

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • In May 2011, Ian Brown sang the teams out at Manchester United player Gary Neville's testimonial, with a rendition of 'This Is The One' - the now traditional curtain-raiser for games at Old Trafford.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • The Stone Roses' third single 'Elephant Stone' was produced by New Order's Peter Hook, brought in by the band's label who saw him as a potential producer of their debut album. In the event, Hooky was committed to his own band's arguably equally astounding 'Technique' and couldn't spare the time.

    Photo: Getty

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • On the making of 'Begging You', John Squire said he was inspired by Public Enemy's 'Fear Of A Black Planet' - cutting up music and reconstructing it. He aborted the mission, but we're marking similarities between 'Begging You' and 'Burn Hollywood Burn'.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • When Pete Townshend saw their first gig in October 1984 - at the Moonlight Club in London where they supported him - he said Reni was the best drummer he'd seen since Keith Moon.

    Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Ex-Roses guitarist, and founder member, Andy Couzens went on to form baggy also-rans The High.

    Photo: Getty

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • According to producer John Leckie, 'Where The Angels Play' was the only abandoned track from the debut album sessions.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Before throwing himself into music, Ian Brown was a keen karate fighter.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • The Stone Roses and debut album producer John Leckie bonded over shared devotion to Love's 1967 psychedelic masterpiece 'Forever Changes'.

    Photo: Getty

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • John Squire once claimed that 'Elephant Stone' is about "love and hate, war and peace, Morecambe and Wise."

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Parts of 'Second Coming' were recorded at Rockfield Studios in Monmouth, where Queen first began laying down 'Bohemian Rhapsody'.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Although legend goes that 'Second Coming' took five years to record (1989-1994), the band didn't start work on it until 1992 owing to legal wrangles extracting them from their contract with Silvertone Records.

    Photo: Getty

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • 'Second Coming' sessions typically lasted from two in the afternoon until one in the morning.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • "I like it enormously. It was worth the wait," said Tony Wilson on 'Second Coming''s release, but the Manchester media guru hadn't always been so supportive. "He actively tried to stop us doing anything," said former Roses guitarist Andy Couzens. "Every corner we turned we felt like he was there shutting the door."

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Backstage at The Stone Roses debut Top Of The Pops appearance in 1989, the band were (according to Mani) "beating on the Fine Young Cannibals' door and trying to get them E'd up".

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Ian Brown initially played bass in The Stone Roses before his King Monkey charisma shone too brightly to be ignored and he was ushered front and centre.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • The version of 'Love Spreads' that appears on 1995 War Child charity album 'Help' is the only Stone Roses recording to feature Robbie Maddix - Reni's then replacement - on drums.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Nigel Ipinson, who played keyboards in the disintegrating mid-90s Stone Roses, formerly turned out for Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark.

    Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • 'Bye Bye Badman' is about the 1968 Paris student riots. "Citrus-sucking sunshine" is a reference to how the students sucked on lemons to combat the effects of tear gas.

    Photo: Getty

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • The cover of The Stone Roses' debut album builds on this theme, with lemon slices strewn across the artwork and the three stripes representing the Tricolor.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Bananarama broke the top 30 in 1990 with 'Only Your Love', which sampled Reni's 'Fools Gold' loop (along with Primal Scream's 'Loaded' and The Rolling Stones' 'Sympathy For The Devil', in a classic satire on baggy).

    Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

    Added: 19 Aug 2012

  • In 2011, Ian Brown told Clash magazine that he's "need to be down to my last chicken dinner" to even consider a Roses reunion. Presumably, these comments were made just prior to The Great Manchester Poultry Shortage.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • 'Fools Gold' was originally intended to be the B-side to 'What The World Is Waiting For', with the shorter number deemed to be more radio-friendly. It took the wise intervention of PR chap Gareth Davies to get Silvertone to swap them over.

    Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • One cunning clause in the band's divisive contract with Silvertone stated that they wouldn't get a bean from the first 30,000 records sold. And to think they got all stressed about it.

    Photo: Andy Willsher/NME

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Obviously a big fan of Roses of all hues, Slash offered to take John Squire's place in the band after the guitarist left - but was sadly rebuffed.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Reni tells a tale of 'I Am The Resurrection' being based on Mani playing Paul McCartney's 'Taxman' riff backwards. What was knockabout japery became a towering, unimpeachable epic.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • When they began recording their debut album, each band member was on the handsome stipend of £10 a day.

    Photo: Getty

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Beck turns up as a gold prospector in the American version of the 'Fools Gold' video.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • The Roses wrote songs for their debut album at unimaginable speed because, on signing to Silvertone, they'd had the brassneck to tell the label they had a portfolio of 30 or 40 songs. Which was a massive porkie.

    Photo: Pennie Smith

    Added: 18 Oct 2011

  • Ian Brown once told the Guardian that The Stone Roses' original mission was rid the world of huge bands like U2. Never mind.

    Photo: Andy Willsher/NME

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Contrary to rumour, the band was named neither after a book nor in tribute to The Rolling Stones, but rather as a stylistic combination of the hard and the soft. That's the current story anyway.

    Photo: Pa Photos

    Added: 17 Oct 2011

  • Aziz Ibrahim, the guitarist who replaced John Squire for the Roses' torrid final furlong before their reformation 15 years later, used to play with another Manchester legend - er, Simply Red.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • And that's nothing. Reni's 1995 replacement Robbie Maddix used to pick up the sticks for 80s pop-soul egomaniac Terence Trent D'Arby and hip-house rapper Rebel MC.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • While we're on drummers, original Roses beatmaster Simon Wolstencroft went on to join yet another troupe of Manchester icons, The Fall.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 23 May 2011

  • Our heroes turned down support slots with New Order and Pixies because, "The Stone Roses have never supported anyone in their life and see no reason why they should now."

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • The last Stone Roses song to be written - 'Ice Cold Cube', reputedly about John Squire - eventually turned up on Ian Brown's 1998 debut solo album 'Unfinished Monkey Business'.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • That's BBC2's Late Show presenter Tracey MacLeod struggling to keep a lid on things as Ian Brown yells "Amateurs!" behind her, on the night the sound broke down during the Roses' first live BBC performance. The banjaxed song was 'Made Of Stone'.

    Photo: Getty

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • While the band were recording second and final album 'Second Coming' at Bury's Square One studios, the pizza boy came knocking. It was Elbow guitarist Mark Potter.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • The cherub on the 'Love Spreads' single sleeve is - well, was - on Newport Bridge. It was half-inched by over-zealous fans.

    Photo: Press

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • According to John Squire, the main 'Fools Gold' riff (not the wah-wah fills) was inspired by the rockabilly sound Johnny Cash achieved when he just played on the bass string.

    Photo: Richard Johnson/NME

    Added: 19 Aug 2012

  • Glamour model and - briefly - pop star Sam Fox hung out with the band occasionally while they made their debut album, and made tea. She was signed to Zomba (part of Silvertone) as well.

    Photo: Amy Brammall/NME

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • The Happy Mondays called Ian Brown 'Mean Boy'. Affectionately.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Prior to the Roses' big breakthrough, John Squire worked as a model maker for Cosgrove Hall, the Manchester animation studio that produced kids TV shows like Wind In The Willows and Danger Mouse.

    Photo: Tom Martin/NME

    Added: 08 Jul 2012

  • That false ending to 'I Am The Resurrection' was pure improvisation. Here's Mani: "We were in the studio and throwing it down. There was lots of eye contact, and then [we all thought] right, stop. And then... bam!"

    Photo: Dan Dennison/NME

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • According to Ian Brown, some of those 'Fools Gold' lyrics - if you can make them out - were inspired by the 1948 Humphrey Bogart movie The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre.

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013

  • Spike Island, the site of the band's legendary 1990 gig, isn't really an island. What do you mean, you knew that?

    Photo: PA

    Added: 11 Apr 2013