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In The City - 35 songs inspired by London

  • Libertines, 'Up The Bracket' (2002). Garage-punk story of dark dealings in Bethnal Green and Pentonville, with a sinister cast from London's criminal netherworld. Darkly thrilling.

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    Added: 23 Jan 2009

  • Dizzee Rascal, 'Stand Up Tall' (2004). A defiant East-side brag by a compulsive celebrant of the city's harshest streets. Pic: Ed Miles

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    Added: 09 Jul 2009

  • M.I.A, 'XR2' (2007). Brick Lane and Ladbroke Grove feature in this energetically nostalgic hymn to the early London rave scene.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Adele, 'Hometown Glory' (2007). Soul-inflected singer-songwriter ponders her London, from the streets to the government, concluding that it's the people she has met who are the 'wonders' of her world.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Pulp, 'Common People' (1995). The northerner Jarvis Cocker kept a nicely sardonic eye on his adopted city; this tale of recreational slumming comes from his time at Central St Martins. Pic: PA Photos

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    Added: 23 Jan 2009

  • The Beatles, 'Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)' (1965). Lennon's brilliant song of surreptitious liaisons with a downstairs neighbour at Emperor's Gate in Kensington. Pic: PA Photos

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    Added: 23 Jan 2009

  • David Bowie, 'The London Boys' (1966). A fine little Soho melodrama from Bowie's Anthony Newley period. His early years are much-anthologised and should not be overlooked. Pic:PA Photos

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    Added: 14 May 2009

  • Jack Penate, 'Torn On The Platform' (2007). Platform 3 of Waterloo Station is the arena for this little tale of London chauvinism. Why would anyone leave this city? Jack is 'torn' by indecision as the carriage doors close. Pic: Andy Willsher

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    Added: 22 Jan 2009

  • The Jam, 'In The City' (1977). All the pent-up sense of possibility that London can present to the energetic incomer, compressed inside of two minutes twenty seconds. Pic: PA Photos

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    Added: 28 May 2009

  • Burial, 'Ghost Hardware' (2007). William Bevan's atmospheric mutation of dancefloor dubstep, sounding like the music of an abandoned city. Words in this gallery taken from 'In The City - A Celebration Of London Music', by Paul Du Noyer.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Elvis Costello, 'London's Brilliant Parade' (1994). A fuller portrait of his home city - both emotionally and geographically - than the better-known '(I Don't Want To Go To) Chelsea'.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Nick Cave, 'Brompton Oratory' (1997). Erotic obsession meets religious majesty in the beautiful interior of a Kensington church.

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    Added: 29 Jun 2009

  • The Kinks, 'Waterloo Sunset' (1967). Perverse not to nominate this song, though it's certainly worth investigating the band's lesser-known London numbers like 'Berkeley Mews', 'Denmark Street', 'Shangri La', 'Big Black Smoke' et al.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Fleetwood Mac, 'Man Of The World' (1969). Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac were never more poignant than here, the song of a haunted man surveying his life and rather wishing he hadn't. Pic: PA Photos

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • The Streets, ' Dry Your Eyes' (2004). And so the old language of anguish finds a new translator, expressing it for the girl on the top deck of the bus, teardrops falling on her MP3 phone.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Hard Fi, 'Tied Up Too Tight' (2005). Discontented Staines gang ('Stars of CCTV', as their debut album had it) resolve to hit the Great West Road in a bid for the bright lights of town. Pic: PA Photos

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • T. Rex, 'London Boys' (1976). Marc Bolan, near the end of his days, returns to the verities of his boyhood, when he could be the boss mod of Petticoat Lane.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Bow Wow Wow, 'C30 C60 C90 GO' (1981). 'Home taping is killing music,' said the record companies. BWW's creator Malcolm McLaren thought otherwise. A celebration of the cassette when it was still seen as guerrilla technology.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • The Byrds, 'Eight Miles High' (1966). Borne aloft to London Airport, Californian boys reach the Beatles' London with a pang of cultural and psychedelic dislocation: the swinging city they heard so much about is rainy-grey and fundamentally foreign.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • The Pretty Things, '13 Chester Street' (1965). Shuddering Brit-blues from the shaggy band who somehow blagged a pad in Belgravia, a short, agreeable stroll from Buckingham Palace. Pic: Photoshot

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Lily Allen, 'LDN' (2006). From old Londinium to text-message LDN the city presents its contradictory faces. Lily is caught between a sunny calypso mood and darker visions of pimps, crack whores and cut-throats. Hogarth, Blake and Dickens would all have empathised.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Kate Bush, 'Moments of Pleasure' (1993). Dreamy recollections of nights passed in Abbey Road. Given the time musicians spend in studios it's surprising how few songs ever mention them. Pic: PA Photos

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Pretenders, 'Talk Of The Town' (1980). The single's artwork showed the West End club, formerly a grand Edwardian music hall, at the peak of its neon glory.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Pet Shop Boys, 'West End Girls' (1985). Tennant and Lowe return obsessively to themes of London, usually from a slightly detached viewpoint ('Sexy Northerner', 'King's Cross'). This was the first and most famous example.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Saint Etienne, 'London Belongs To Me' (1991). From under a willow tree at Regent's Park, from Camden Tube via Parkway, it's a shimmering recollection of one romantic day when peace reclaimed the heart. Pic: PA Photos

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Warren Zevon, 'Werewolves of London' (1978). A jangling comic-rock delight, classically Yank in its Hollywood version of Soho's ill-lit alleyways, and a fearsome hirsute character who has lately wrought terror in Mayfair.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Amy Winehouse, 'Take The Box' (2003). Wonderful storytelling. Break-up numbers lend themselves to widescreen performances. But it's the sordid trivia of separation that's dwelt on here. Pic: Tom Oxley

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    Added: 22 Jan 2009

  • Wiley, 'Slippin' (2007). The boy from Grimesville E3, finds himself stranded in South-West London. Being in the wrong place at the wrong time, he resolves to 'splurt'. Pic: Tom Martin

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    Added: 27 Jun 2009

  • The Rolling Stones, 'Play With Fire' (1965). The social highs and lows of London, surveyed with level contempt.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Nick Drake, 'Sunday' (1970). Forever at odds with London's unmerciful tumult, Drake may have written this peaceful instrumental in tribute to the one day when life slowed to a tolerable pace.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • The Clash, 'Police On My Back' (1980). 'Guns Of Brixton' and 'London Calling' are incandescent. But their version of Eddy Grant's 'Police On My Back' is fiercer yet. Pic: PA Photos

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • The Who, 'Real Good-Looking Boy' (2004). Their hits are pretty familiar but this sad tale of a west London childhood is a late addition to Pete Townshend's great achievements. Pic: PA Photos

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • Squeeze, 'Up The Junction', (1979). An evergreen contender for the title of all-time London Favourite, though 'Waterloo Sunset' still looks unassailable. But then, who needs to choose?

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009

  • The Damned, 'New Rose' (1976). The official first blast of UK punk, reverberating down the ages. Pic: Photoshot. Words in this gallery taken from 'In The City - A Celebration Of London Music', by Paul Du Noyer.

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    Added: 08 Jul 2009